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  • Beef or pork?

    Hello to you all!

    I finally found where I could buy grass-fed beef and pastured pork both organic and free-range.

    My question is, on the nutritional point of view, is the higher cost of the grass-fed beef justified or I could just buy pastured pork? Or maybe more variety is always better?

    I wonder about bone marrow and liver too.

    Thanks a lot!

  • #2
    Variety is best....I favor pork more often lately, but eat a handy amount of both.

    Bone marrow and liver? The answer is YES!

    In summer here I have alternated slow smoking a 10lb pork shoulder with about the same size beef brisket every weekend. This gets me meat to about Thursday. Then I cook a chicken, fish or steak for a day or two and start the cycle again on Saturday. Love my new BBQ pit! And my kid is a pulled pork fanatic.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Coccinellee View Post
      Or maybe more variety is always better?
      That's what I do. Beef is often preferred for the lower O6 content, though my inner cheapskate loves pork. When I get beef it's round roast or brisket (not steak).

      Pork quality is more vulnerable to poor feed--if you trust your source this is less of an issue.
      37//6'3"/185

      My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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      • #4
        I vote for variety. Personally I'm gonna try my darndest to hunt and catch most of my protein for fall, winter and spring. My boy starts preschool this year so I'll be able to put the time in out in the woods and on the water. I'm currently a stay at home dad.

        Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Variety in high quality meats. But like the others have said, Beef>Pork for the same reasons as above.

          Both taste amazing and lend themselves to different cuisine. Beef steaks rule. Pork roasts can be done carribean jerk style and they are unbeatable.

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          • #6
            Love both. I alternate pretty much between pork, beef, lamb and chicken, with the occasional (free range) duck as I just love both the meat and the duck stock later!

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            • #7
              Choose beef, because it has less of the unstable polyunsaturated fats.
              My opinions and some justification

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              • #8
                Thanks everyone!

                I think I'll try both and see how I like the taste. For now I only tried ground pork and it tasted heavenly, definitely worth the price!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Elliot View Post
                  Choose beef, because it has less of the unstable polyunsaturated fats.
                  op isn't talking about industrial pigs.
                  As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                  – Ernest Hemingway

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                    op isn't talking about industrial pigs.
                    That's irrelevant. OP mentioned pastured pigs, which can still be fed corn and soy. I worked briefly on a farm that raised pastured pigs, and that's what they were fed.

                    Even if the pigs are fed a more "natural" diet, they will still have more polyunsaturated fat than ruminant meat. Ruminants hydrogenate the fat they eat, while pigs do not.
                    My opinions and some justification

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                    • #11
                      i understand the nature of what "pastured" pigs may actually eat. that being said, "pufa, pufa, pufa"? it's not the same as gulping cottonseed oil and as it's bound in animal meat with both naturally occurring protein and sat fat it's not deadly.
                      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                      – Ernest Hemingway

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                        i understand the nature of what "pastured" pigs may actually eat. that being said, "pufa, pufa, pufa"? it's not the same as gulping cottonseed oil and as it's bound in animal meat with both naturally occurring protein and sat fat it's not deadly.
                        Then we appear to disagree.
                        My opinions and some justification

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Elliot View Post
                          Then we appear to disagree.

                          wouldn't be the first time.
                          As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                          – Ernest Hemingway

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Elliot View Post
                            That's irrelevant. OP mentioned pastured pigs, which can still be fed corn and soy. I worked briefly on a farm that raised pastured pigs, and that's what they were fed.

                            Even if the pigs are fed a more "natural" diet, they will still have more polyunsaturated fat than ruminant meat. Ruminants hydrogenate the fat they eat, while pigs do not.
                            This is why for me, beef (and bison) are staple, whereas pork is occasional (because life isn't worth living without jerk pork and fried plaintain once in a while).

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                            • #15
                              Wait a minute, are you saying that I shouldn't use lard? I thought it was better than other oils, right up with tallow and ghee.

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