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  • Sugar in milk products

    I'd like to more clearly understand how so many primals are able to eat yogurt or drink milk and not stall their weight loss or even gain. I've reached my weight goal and have been maintaining for over two years. I'd like to be able to add yogurt to the things I eat but I hesitate when I see the amount of sugar in it. I don't particularly like milk and seldom use it. Some people have suggested that the sugar (in the Lactose I guess) is different somehow and doesn't count.

  • #2
    There is sugar, using the all encompassing definition, in almost everything we eat outside of meat. When milk is fermented into yogurt, the lactose and other sugars are mostly changed into acids. You can't get rid of the carbs, because all it did was change from one form to the other, but the sugar is mostly gone.

    Be aware that almost all low fat and non-fat yogurts add a lot of sugar! Sometimes the difference in calories between full fat and no fat is virtually none. A few brands don't play that game, read the labels.

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    • #3
      fermentation needs sugar to occur, so the sugars in milk get eaten while the product eventually becomes cheese or yogurt. the "sugar" count you read on most of those labels is the initial count for the milk. some studies suggest at least 1/2 the carbs get eaten before the milk becomes yogurt. what carbs remain are in the whey which is why harder cheeses and greek-style yogurts are naturally lower-carb.

      i rarely have more than 3-4 ounces of yogurt at a time, which is very lc.
      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

      – Ernest Hemingway

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      • #4
        Thanks to you both. I plan to buy some plain, full fat yogurt with live cultures, of course , if I can find it, and enjoy it. Also, I'm going to drain some to get a denser consistency.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Rosemary 231 View Post
          Thanks to you both. I plan to buy some plain, full fat yogurt with live cultures, of course , if I can find it, and enjoy it. Also, I'm going to drain some to get a denser consistency.

          ...if you want a really thick (and low-carb, high-protein) yogurt, try some plain, unflavored Skyr. It's like Greek yogurt but just better...hebs

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          • #6
            Originally posted by hebsie View Post
            ...if you want a really thick (and low-carb, high-protein) yogurt, try some plain, unflavored Skyr. It's like Greek yogurt but just better...hebs
            Thanks

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            • #7
              I don't think sugar is inherently fattening. In fact, it has a higher thermic effect than fat.
              My opinions and some justification

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              • #8
                It doesn't help your low carb desires, but skyr with a teaspoon of maple syrup drizzled on top is delicious.
                https://instagram.com/dinnerwithek/

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                • #9
                  Dairy can be part of a healthy plan but is in no way required. Just choose a full fat version without fillers or added sugar. Should have less than 10g of carbs per serving. If you are one of the many who dairy does not agree with just recognize that you don't need it, so eliminating it after a trial is no problem.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                    Dairy can be part of a healthy plan but is in no way required. Just choose a full fat version without fillers or added sugar. Should have less than 10g of carbs per serving. If you are one of the many who dairy does not agree with just recognize that you don't need it, so eliminating it after a trial is no problem.
                    Thankfully I have no problem with dairy. I avoid milk because I don't like it and Mom made us drink it every day for "strong bones and teeth". There is so much emphasis on keeping the fat intake high our low carb diets that I ran wild with cream cheese, heavy cream, butter and on and on disregarding the fact that calories do count . . . eventually. I've got myself under control now and I'm slowly losing the six lbs. I gained during and after I left the hospital.

                    I have osteoporosis and I'd rather get my calcium through dairy and other high calcium foods than take supplements. I love yogurt and plan to trade the heavy cream for it in salad dressings and other adaptable recipes. It's just a matter of habit that I drain the whey from my plain full fat yogurt, when I can find it, for a thicker denser product.

                    I appreciate all the feed back I've received from my original post. I understand now how the sugar is "disarmed" and I won't worry about it.

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                    • #11
                      The sugar in dairy (provided it's plain dairy with nothing added), is lactose. Lactose is broken down into glucose (which we can use), and is absent of fructose which we don't have any real use for.

                      The next part of the equation you already answered was that you can handle dairy. Where people usually get stop dead in their tracks is issues with dairy, all be it weight gain, sinuses. sleepless etc.. If you have no ill effects, then by all means, add it back.

                      Off topic a bit, because you mentioned osteoporosis, have you thought of adding some collagen in your diet? You can buy supplements for it (without having to get it from bone broth). One of the popular ones is hydrolyzed collagen.

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                      • #12
                        if you're worried about calcium, look for grass-fed dairy, which comes with more k2. k2 helps the calcium wind up where it should. sardines and canned salmon with bones are both excellent sources for calcium with complementary ratios of other minerals for best bioavailability.
                        As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                        – Ernest Hemingway

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by WestCoastFire View Post

                          Off topic a bit, because you mentioned osteoporosis, have you thought of adding some collagen in your diet? You can buy supplements for it (without having to get it from bone broth). One of the popular ones is hydrolyzed collagen.
                          I've heard of hydrolyzed collagen but didn't know that it could benefit osteoporosis. Mostly my collagen comes from the bone broth. Many times it's difficult to keep bone broth on hand when I'm drinking it every day. Of course it can be made ahead and frozen but I use large amounts in soup too. Thanks.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                            if you're worried about calcium, look for grass-fed dairy, which comes with more k2. k2 helps the calcium wind up where it should. sardines and canned salmon with bones are both excellent sources for calcium with complementary ratios of other minerals for best bioavailability.
                            Grass-fed dairy is an option I hadn't thought about and an expense I might make the stretch for especially if I didn't need to take the supplements.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Rosemary 231 View Post
                              Thanks to you both. I plan to buy some plain, full fat yogurt with live cultures, of course , if I can find it, and enjoy it. Also, I'm going to drain some to get a denser consistency.
                              Why drain? That's what Greek style is. All you are doing is throwing out the whey, which is practically the best protein for you body for many reasons. Mark did a big write up on it. Frankly, I was surprised. Like collagen, something close to a superfood.

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