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  • One of those days

    I'm at a bit of a crossroads with regards to fitness and nutrition. To give you a bit of background, I'm a 24yo male, weigh 190, BF% probably 12-15, I play soccer 2-3 times a week and I'm relatively fit.

    All good stuff on paper and I don't doubt that I'm in better than average shape but I never feel like I have a decent control over my nutrition. The exercise almost takes care of itself - it's second nature to me but even that at the moment is a bit all over the place, I have always exercised and always will but I feel uncomfortable without some kind of program of sorts.

    I like the idea of Primal eating and have eaten in a similar way before but every time I change the pattern of my eating it seems that it's only a matter of time before something happens and I'm back to square one. I know that I haven't got far to go in terms of losing body fat so I wonder whether it's a hormonal thing.

    As I mentioned I feel most comfortable with some kind of rigid exercise plan yet I can make it difficult for myself as I will want to get stronger, get quicker and fitter all at the same time whilst dropping bodyfat so I know I'm my own worst enemy on that front!

    This is as much a rant as anything else in all honesty! My questions are though, what would you do in my situation?

    With regards to exercise, getting soccer-specific fitter would have to be my most important goal. Repeated sprint ability I believe it is known as.
    Nutrition, my diet is generally pretty solid up until around 7pm when the sweet craving kicks in and I can polish off a tub of B&Js without a second thought.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Welcome. You've come to a good place. The best advice I can give you at this point is to thoroughly comprehend what is meant by "reprogram your genes", as presented elsewhere on this site and the numerous books written by Mark Sisson. With your athletic interests, I'm sure you will relate well with his experience, knowledge and advice. Yes, you can buy his work, but you can also get these benefits for free, right here. Look above at the "Start Here" button and go to the first post by Mark Sisson. You'll find links to just about his entire library of Primal knowledge. Or, you can follow this link if you prefer. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...d17722-31.html
    Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
    Old Paths ... New Journeys

    Comment


    • #3
      What do you mean by "something happens?" All possible responses hinge on that unknown.

      John's advice is spot on and succinct.

      Comment


      • #4
        At 12-15% body fat it sounds like you have pretty much arrived on body composition.
        While I was not a soccer guy, my kids were. They were all in superior shape and able to sprint longer and faster than their compatriots coming from other sports. At the high school level the coaches were always having them do a lot of repetitive sprint type work, either through longer field small side scrimmages are simply doing repetitive sprints.

        PB is a forgiving plan, you can fall off the wagon and climb back on. If you can keep mostly on track I think you will gains on the endurance side of your repetitive sprinting ability as your body becomes fat adapted. Do as John says, and try to hold to the plan long enough to start seeing some benefits, normally it will be "I feel better" and hopefully you'll see a lessened appetite for the off-plan foods. Once that happens, it becomes self reinforcing and easier to stay with.

        I agree with OTB, when you say something happens, are you talking about getting sick, injured, or just having a few bad days at Pizza Hut and McDonalds and falling off the wagon?
        Finally have given up on MDA Forum.
        My friends, I'll see ya at primalforums.com where I'm user #4, and we do have a moderator.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey OP, I will post a link here for you, which you may or may not find helpful Either way it's an entertaining video about plateauing:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83nEQAO_U9k

          The basic gist to this video is we are our own worst enemy when it comes to getting the results we want. The 2 biggest problems people come across is we actually don't eat enough and we certainly don't sleep enough. You are like me in the respect I like to have some sort of rigid exercise plan to follow as it feels like you're progressing towards something. You want to get stronger, quicker, and fitter, and as you said you are your own worst enemy, so perhaps that link I posted will be a wake up call. Now when I hear the words "After 7pm I get sweet cravings", immediately my next question to you is, how much do you sleep on average each night, and how is the quality? I, like you, often had the same problem, although mine kicked in at about 9pm.

          It is in my opinion (though some may not agree), is that sweet or sugar cravings are a sign that your body temperature is lower than it should be. Core body temperature can drop at least under 4 circumstances that I know of; not enough sleep or poor sleep quality, not enough calories or carbs, too much exercise, and stress. Sleep is usually the grand daddy of the culprits because it cascades down to 2 of the others. If you are not sleeping enough, believe me, your temperature goes down. It also just so happens that sugar and sweets happen to provide the largest temperature rise when digested. Hence I think people's sugar cravings are tied into a lower temperature. All food we eat raises our temperature. This explains why I had intense sweet cravings at night because I didn't eat enough, nor did I sleep enough. Once those issues were addressed, the weight started to fall off again and the cravings stopped.

          My next question would be, how much are you actually eating, because you will need to keep the thermal burners going if you want to have any hope of cutting. From reading your situation, I'm going to guess you probably aren't eating enough, and sleep (because it's common with so many people), is not something you get enough of either, am I right? Keep in mind, when I say you may need to eat more, that doesn't mean pizza and mcdonalds, it means real food.

          Edit - Also keep in mind, progression is not linear. Don't expect to just constantly flow straight to your goal. I think of it as a staircase, if you're going up, don't expect to just keep going up until you reach your goal. Expect to go up part way, down a bit, then up even higher next time, rinse and repeat.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by John Caton View Post
            Welcome. You've come to a good place. The best advice I can give you at this point is to thoroughly comprehend what is meant by "reprogram your genes", as presented elsewhere on this site and the numerous books written by Mark Sisson. With your athletic interests, I'm sure you will relate well with his experience, knowledge and advice. Yes, you can buy his work, but you can also get these benefits for free, right here. Look above at the "Start Here" button and go to the first post by Mark Sisson. You'll find links to just about his entire library of Primal knowledge. Or, you can follow this link if you prefer. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...d17722-31.html
            Thanks for this. I have a bit of experience with this site so it's good to cover old ground and remind myself.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by OnTheBayou View Post
              What do you mean by "something happens?" All possible responses hinge on that unknown.

              John's advice is spot on and succinct.
              Usually something food related, most commonly a tub of ice cream!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Rig D View Post
                At 12-15% body fat it sounds like you have pretty much arrived on body composition.
                While I was not a soccer guy, my kids were. They were all in superior shape and able to sprint longer and faster than their compatriots coming from other sports. At the high school level the coaches were always having them do a lot of repetitive sprint type work, either through longer field small side scrimmages are simply doing repetitive sprints.

                PB is a forgiving plan, you can fall off the wagon and climb back on. If you can keep mostly on track I think you will gains on the endurance side of your repetitive sprinting ability as your body becomes fat adapted. Do as John says, and try to hold to the plan long enough to start seeing some benefits, normally it will be "I feel better" and hopefully you'll see a lessened appetite for the off-plan foods. Once that happens, it becomes self reinforcing and easier to stay with.

                I agree with OTB, when you say something happens, are you talking about getting sick, injured, or just having a few bad days at Pizza Hut and McDonalds and falling off the wagon?
                I do enjoy the approach here, psychologically it seems the most sensible and realistic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by WestCoastFire View Post
                  Hey OP, I will post a link here for you, which you may or may not find helpful Either way it's an entertaining video about plateauing:

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83nEQAO_U9k

                  The basic gist to this video is we are our own worst enemy when it comes to getting the results we want. The 2 biggest problems people come across is we actually don't eat enough and we certainly don't sleep enough. You are like me in the respect I like to have some sort of rigid exercise plan to follow as it feels like you're progressing towards something. You want to get stronger, quicker, and fitter, and as you said you are your own worst enemy, so perhaps that link I posted will be a wake up call. Now when I hear the words "After 7pm I get sweet cravings", immediately my next question to you is, how much do you sleep on average each night, and how is the quality? I, like you, often had the same problem, although mine kicked in at about 9pm.

                  It is in my opinion (though some may not agree), is that sweet or sugar cravings are a sign that your body temperature is lower than it should be. Core body temperature can drop at least under 4 circumstances that I know of; not enough sleep or poor sleep quality, not enough calories or carbs, too much exercise, and stress. Sleep is usually the grand daddy of the culprits because it cascades down to 2 of the others. If you are not sleeping enough, believe me, your temperature goes down. It also just so happens that sugar and sweets happen to provide the largest temperature rise when digested. Hence I think people's sugar cravings are tied into a lower temperature. All food we eat raises our temperature. This explains why I had intense sweet cravings at night because I didn't eat enough, nor did I sleep enough. Once those issues were addressed, the weight started to fall off again and the cravings stopped.

                  My next question would be, how much are you actually eating, because you will need to keep the thermal burners going if you want to have any hope of cutting. From reading your situation, I'm going to guess you probably aren't eating enough, and sleep (because it's common with so many people), is not something you get enough of either, am I right? Keep in mind, when I say you may need to eat more, that doesn't mean pizza and mcdonalds, it means real food.

                  Edit - Also keep in mind, progression is not linear. Don't expect to just constantly flow straight to your goal. I think of it as a staircase, if you're going up, don't expect to just keep going up until you reach your goal. Expect to go up part way, down a bit, then up even higher next time, rinse and repeat.
                  I think I sleep ok. I'm in bed by 10pm most nights, get up at 6.30 twice a week and otherwise somewhere between 7-8am, I'm a morning person, always have been. Can't tell you about the quality of sleep but I'm almost never tired when I get into bed if that gives you a clue?

                  As for exercise, I workout quite a bit, mostly bodyweight stuff these days though if I'm organised I'll sprint once or twice a week.
                  Last edited by Legenary1; 02-21-2016, 08:33 AM.

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