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  • Help! Dog Labs

    Does anyone know anything about dog labs? Cholesterol etc... I need help with questions about my pugs labs and I haven't been able to find anything online

  • #2
    Ask your vet? Why do you think their cholesterol is a problem?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mzzmisty View Post
      Does anyone know anything about dog labs? Cholesterol etc... I need help with questions about my pugs labs and I haven't been able to find anything online
      Depends on many factors; is it just cholesterol? If the dogs are fed a PMR diet, their lab numbers are going to be different than kibble fed dogs, too.

      Comment


      • #4
        I did ask my vet.. They are all about conventional wisdom but for dogs.. They believe they need a lower fat higher carb crappier food diet.. I do my research and I'm at a point where I just can't figure out what high triglycerides Might mean in dogs.. Only one of my pugs has a high triglyceride level .. And although I don't believe they should be eating a lower fat diet.. Right now they are on Orijen Six Fish.. It's a decent food

        ALTHOUGH THEY MAY LOOK VERY DIFFERENT, YOUR DOG SHARES HIS EATING ANATOMY WITH THE GREY WOLF — WHICH MEANS HE’S EVOLVED AS A CARNIVORE AND ADAPTED FOR A DIET RICH AND VARIED IN MEAT — NOT CARBOHYDRATES AND GRAINS.

        FISH AND PROTEIN RICH
        Featuring a full 80% of salmon, flounder, herring, walleye, northern pike and lake whitefish, ORIJEN features a Biologically Appropriate protein level of 38% which closely replicates the natural diet.

        RICH IN ESSENTIAL FISH OILS
        Animal fats are essential for peak health. That’s why ORIJEN features naturally occurring, non-rendered fats from fresh poultry, fish and eggs.

        DHA AND EPA FROM FRESH FISH
        Fresh fish is a perfect source of DHA and EPA, essential for your dog’s immune and nervous systems and not available from plant source, such as flax, coconut or sunflower.

        LOW GLYCEMIC
        Your dog’s natural diet contains few carbohydrates. That’s why ORIJEN is potato-free and contains less than half the carbohydrates found in conventional dog foods.

        GLUCOSAMINE & CHONDROITIN
        ORIJEN’s high ratios of fresh fish provide a rich source of glucosamine and chondroitin, which is derived naturally from our fresh ingredients, and without adding synthetics to our foods.

        GUARANTEED ANALYSIS

        Crude protein (min.) 38%
        Crude fat (min.) 18%
        Crude fiber (max.) 5%
        Moisture (max.) 10%
        Calcium (min./max) 1.4%
        Phosphorus (min./max) 1.1%
        Omega-6 (min.) 2.6 %
        Omega-3 (min.) 1.8%
        DHA (min.) 1%
        EPA (min.) 0.6%
        Ash (max.) 8%
        Glucosamine (min.) 1250 mg
        Chondroitin (min.) 1000 mg



        So the Cholestrol range for his labs were 92-324 and his Cholestrol was 267 .. The triglyceride range is 29-291 and his was 770 .. Other than his food he doesn't get other products with fat .. Last year he had pancreatitis so they wanted him on a lower fat diet .. They said that his pancreatitis was caused by the fat that I was feeding him (at that time) .. I think it was caused by a low dose of steroids he was on at that time .. His whole life he was getting fish oil, coconut oil, eggs .. And he was fine until the stupid steroids .. I think it was the steroids that had caused his pancreatitis .. Before that his labs seemed normal too.. He's at a healthy weight and is not obese .. He goes for at least 1 hour walk everyday ..sometimes 2 walks ..

        I guess I'm trying to figure out if that lab value in dogs is REALLY a problem.. Or is it like humans .. When our cholesterol is high they don't take into account the ratios ...etc. they just think conventionally ... And if it is high... Is it high because he stopped getting fat and now his liver is overproducing?

        All I want is a healthy and happy dog for a long time .. And I don't want him to get sick again with pancreatitis..

        If anyone has any advice about this I would really appreciate it ..

        Comment


        • #5

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mzzmisty View Post
            I did ask my vet.. They are all about conventional wisdom but for dogs.. They believe they need a lower fat higher carb crappier food diet.. I do my research and I'm at a point where I just can't figure out what high triglycerides Might mean in dogs.. Only one of my pugs has a high triglyceride level .. And although I don't believe they should be eating a lower fat diet.. Right now they are on Orijen Six Fish.. It's a decent food

            ALTHOUGH THEY MAY LOOK VERY DIFFERENT, YOUR DOG SHARES HIS EATING ANATOMY WITH THE GREY WOLF — WHICH MEANS HE’S EVOLVED AS A CARNIVORE AND ADAPTED FOR A DIET RICH AND VARIED IN MEAT — NOT CARBOHYDRATES AND GRAINS.

            FISH AND PROTEIN RICH
            Featuring a full 80% of salmon, flounder, herring, walleye, northern pike and lake whitefish, ORIJEN features a Biologically Appropriate protein level of 38% which closely replicates the natural diet.

            RICH IN ESSENTIAL FISH OILS
            Animal fats are essential for peak health. That’s why ORIJEN features naturally occurring, non-rendered fats from fresh poultry, fish and eggs.

            DHA AND EPA FROM FRESH FISH
            Fresh fish is a perfect source of DHA and EPA, essential for your dog’s immune and nervous systems and not available from plant source, such as flax, coconut or sunflower.

            LOW GLYCEMIC
            Your dog’s natural diet contains few carbohydrates. That’s why ORIJEN is potato-free and contains less than half the carbohydrates found in conventional dog foods.

            GLUCOSAMINE & CHONDROITIN
            ORIJEN’s high ratios of fresh fish provide a rich source of glucosamine and chondroitin, which is derived naturally from our fresh ingredients, and without adding synthetics to our foods.

            GUARANTEED ANALYSIS

            Crude protein (min.) 38%
            Crude fat (min.) 18%
            Crude fiber (max.) 5%
            Moisture (max.) 10%
            Calcium (min./max) 1.4%
            Phosphorus (min./max) 1.1%
            Omega-6 (min.) 2.6 %
            Omega-3 (min.) 1.8%
            DHA (min.) 1%
            EPA (min.) 0.6%
            Ash (max.) 8%
            Glucosamine (min.) 1250 mg
            Chondroitin (min.) 1000 mg



            So the Cholestrol range for his labs were 92-324 and his Cholestrol was 267 .. The triglyceride range is 29-291 and his was 770 .. Other than his food he doesn't get other products with fat .. Last year he had pancreatitis so they wanted him on a lower fat diet .. They said that his pancreatitis was caused by the fat that I was feeding him (at that time) .. I think it was caused by a low dose of steroids he was on at that time .. His whole life he was getting fish oil, coconut oil, eggs .. And he was fine until the stupid steroids .. I think it was the steroids that had caused his pancreatitis .. Before that his labs seemed normal too.. He's at a healthy weight and is not obese .. He goes for at least 1 hour walk everyday ..sometimes 2 walks ..

            I guess I'm trying to figure out if that lab value in dogs is REALLY a problem.. Or is it like humans .. When our cholesterol is high they don't take into account the ratios ...etc. they just think conventionally ... And if it is high... Is it high because he stopped getting fat and now his liver is overproducing?

            All I want is a healthy and happy dog for a long time .. And I don't want him to get sick again with pancreatitis..

            If anyone has any advice about this I would really appreciate it ..
            Many conventional vets feel that pancreatitis is caused by high fat diets alone, but a lot of holistic veterinarians feel that steroids can trigger it in individuals who are genetically predisposed to it (I believe Pugs fall into that category). Blood and lab work aside, was this an acute case, or is his pancreatitis chronic? In pancreatitis, it sometimes IS necessary to cut the fat lower, at least while your dog is recovering. Years ago we had a dog come down with what appeared to be a pancreatitis; she was never tested "positive" but sure acted like she had it. We feed a raw diet, but for her we started cooking bland, low fat meats she could have (turkey breast was a hit). We boiled most meats to remove the majority of the fat. Truthfully her coat looked like absolute shit on this diet but her problems seemed to slowly disappear. She got back on raw, and we were able to slowly add certain fats back into her diet. As disgusting as it sounds we were able to get our hands on raw beef pancreas, and fed her some every day or every other day as an added boost to an organ that was having problems. It's a juggling act, because certain dogs do better on certain amounts of fat once they've been affected. Orijen is a great food with a great track record, and if I fed kibble I would consider it, but at the end of the day it's still a carb based kibble which may or may not be the best thing for a dog with this problem.
            JMO of course, but I would look like hell to find a holistic veterinarian who is willing to work with you and supports holistic care; meaning a raw, species appropriate diet, minimal to no vaccinations or topical flea pesticides, etc and doesn't push bags of rendered corn as the best nutrition you can offer a carnivore.
            I cannot comment on the blood values; however if the vet was pushing Science Diet in lieu of Orijen, I'd have my suspicions on their ideas of what constitutes a "healthy" dog. Again, JMO.
            Check out Mary Strauss's articles on this. http://www.dogaware.com/articles/wdjpancreatitis.html. A quote from the website: "Corticosteroids such as prednisone are especially controversial: while veterinarians have long considered them to be the most common drug to cause pancreatitis, recent human studies have discounted this link. Based on anecdotal evidence, however, I believe the association does exist in dogs. I personally know dogs who developed pancreatitis within days of being given corticosteroids. "
            You and Mary seem to be on the same page! Best of luck.
            I hope this helps and that you can find a good solution.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Shelly6 View Post
              Many conventional vets feel that pancreatitis is caused by high fat diets alone, but a lot of holistic veterinarians feel that steroids can trigger it in individuals who are genetically predisposed to it (I believe Pugs fall into that category). Blood and lab work aside, was this an acute case, or is his pancreatitis chronic? In pancreatitis, it sometimes IS necessary to cut the fat lower, at least while your dog is recovering. Years ago we had a dog come down with what appeared to be a pancreatitis; she was never tested "positive" but sure acted like she had it. We feed a raw diet, but for her we started cooking bland, low fat meats she could have (turkey breast was a hit). We boiled most meats to remove the majority of the fat. Truthfully her coat looked like absolute shit on this diet but her problems seemed to slowly disappear. She got back on raw, and we were able to slowly add certain fats back into her diet. As disgusting as it sounds we were able to get our hands on raw beef pancreas, and fed her some every day or every other day as an added boost to an organ that was having problems. It's a juggling act, because certain dogs do better on certain amounts of fat once they've been affected. Orijen is a great food with a great track record, and if I fed kibble I would consider it, but at the end of the day it's still a carb based kibble which may or may not be the best thing for a dog with this problem.
              JMO of course, but I would look like hell to find a holistic veterinarian who is willing to work with you and supports holistic care; meaning a raw, species appropriate diet, minimal to no vaccinations or topical flea pesticides, etc and doesn't push bags of rendered corn as the best nutrition you can offer a carnivore.
              I cannot comment on the blood values; however if the vet was pushing Science Diet in lieu of Orijen, I'd have my suspicions on their ideas of what constitutes a "healthy" dog. Again, JMO.
              Check out Mary Strauss's articles on this. http://www.dogaware.com/articles/wdjpancreatitis.html. A quote from the website: "Corticosteroids such as prednisone are especially controversial: while veterinarians have long considered them to be the most common drug to cause pancreatitis, recent human studies have discounted this link. Based on anecdotal evidence, however, I believe the association does exist in dogs. I personally know dogs who developed pancreatitis within days of being given corticosteroids. "
              You and Mary seem to be on the same page! Best of luck.
              I hope this helps and that you can find a good solution.

              Thank you for your well informed response, I really appreciate it. Odie only had that one episode of pancreatitis that I truly believe was because of the steroids.. The only worry I have is that I can't "prove" it .. I was thinking since he's been ok to work on transitioning back to a better more holistic species appropriate diet, such as raw.. I just worry that if it did happen again it might be a losing situation. Pancreatitis is a 60/40 chance of survival when it's an acute onset such as his was.. Such a scary thought.. And now that I see his triglycerides are that high I worry that adding more fat might increase his odds of getting pancreatitis again...but then when I think about humans and adding more fat into our diet tends to improve our Cholestrol ..I wonder if it works the same for dogs.. Thanks for the link to website for Mary Strauss I will check it out..and I'll keep searching for the Holistic Vets.. It's hard to find one over here .. Hopefully I can find a solution that works and keeps him healthy ..

              Comment


              • #8
                You're very welcome. Even if you can't prove it, he's your dog and no one elses. I know it can be a nasty disease that can crop up unexpectedly, but I do know that adding fat should be a very slow process, closely monitored in cases like this.
                Best of luck.

                Comment

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