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  • Alternative flour pasta for preggo

    I'm early in my first trimester and the aversions are kicking in. Pasta is about the only thing that sounds good. I was all set to go on rice pasta when I was reminded of the arsenic issue. I'd like to stay gluten free as long as I can... any suggestions for pasta (don't bother suggesting zucchini noodles, I am a Spiralizing guru but right now veggies - blch).

    Quinoa pasta is out there - maybe I can even find a brand that isn't mostly corn flour... any opinions? Is there some secret about quinoa like there is rice?

    What about buckwheat noodles - those are gluten free right?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by lorichka6 View Post
    What about buckwheat noodles - those are gluten free right?
    If they're 100% yes, but most brands are wheat with only a little buckwheat.
    37//6'3"/185

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    • #3
      If gluten-free is your only criterion, then you can find plenty of GF pasta on Amazon. Probably in your grocery store too. Just look for the label "gluten free."
      I moved to primalforums.com to escape the spam.

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      • #4
        trader joe's has black bean pasta, but i haven't tried it.

        if you have access to an asian grocer you can find sweet potato and mung bean noodles too.

        what about potatoes?
        As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

        – Ernest Hemingway

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        • #5
          The source of the rice is the criteria for potential arsenic. American rice is more likely to have some levels of arsenic due to former cotton growing fields converting to rice fields. It may not be easy to source non-American rice pasta in America. I've tried quinoa pasta and it's not bad.
          Last edited by John Caton; 05-10-2016, 04:09 PM.
          Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
          Old Paths ... New Journeys

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          • #6
            Thanks guys. I'm really intrigued about the sweet potato noodles. There are a few Asian stores near me - I've never even heard of sweet potato noodles!

            In reality, all I really want is toast but I really don't want to eat very processed foods if I can help it (thus, trying to avoid the GF pasta and bread). The quinoa noodles I saw on line looked good because they were quinoa and water (maybe egg white?) only. We will see. So far the aversions are pretty subtle (I'm only 6 weeks) and I'd really like to eat as whole-foods based as I can for as long as I can.

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            • #7
              the aversion phase usually passes, so good luck!
              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

              – Ernest Hemingway

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lorichka6 View Post
                Thanks guys. I'm really intrigued about the sweet potato noodles. There are a few Asian stores near me - I've never even heard of sweet potato noodles!

                In reality, all I really want is toast but I really don't want to eat very processed foods if I can help it (thus, trying to avoid the GF pasta and bread). The quinoa noodles I saw on line looked good because they were quinoa and water (maybe egg white?) only. We will see. So far the aversions are pretty subtle (I'm only 6 weeks) and I'd really like to eat as whole-foods based as I can for as long as I can.
                Sour dough and sprouted grain breads will be gluten free if tradionally prepared. Commercial sour dough breads can't fully be trusted as they may not truly be fermented. Rsearch your sources. . Sprouted grain breads are readily available but read the ingredient lists. Ezekiel bread, for example, may have added gluten which completely negates one big benefit of sprouted grain bread.

                The best place to be is to not need or crave pasta and bread.
                Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
                Old Paths ... New Journeys

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                • #9
                  I remember finding a recipe for homemade almond flour pasta. There is a company (capello's, maybe?) that sells almond flour pasta too. The reviews are fairly good, but it is EXPENSIVE and requires refrigeration. I've found some pasta at Kroger that is made with mostly quinoa and a little brown rice, and it's fairly decent. I'd definitely eat it in moderation, though!


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                  • #10
                    https://authoritynutrition.com/shirataki-noodles-101/
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                    • #11
                      are those the ones that taste like fishy rubber bands?
                      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                      – Ernest Hemingway

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                      • #12
                        If you don't eat the pasta for nutrition, you could try kelp noodles. I find them delicious but pricey. They have a pretty neutral taste too.

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                        • #13
                          Sourdough and sprouted grain still contain gluten if they are made from wheat, rye, or barley. If a person needs to be gluten free due to a gluten intolerance, they cannot eat anything made with wheat, rye, or barley, whether fermented, sprouted, or otherwise.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sonora View Post
                            Sourdough and sprouted grain still contain gluten if they are made from wheat, rye, or barley. If a person needs to be gluten free due to a gluten intolerance, they cannot eat anything made with wheat, rye, or barley, whether fermented, sprouted, or otherwise.
                            this doesn't apply to the op or she wouldn't be considering eating gluten at all, would she?
                            As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                            – Ernest Hemingway

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The black bean pasta from Explore Asia (or something like that) is very good. It's hands down the best noodle substitute I've come across.

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