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  • fresh organic corn

    Is there anything wrong with fresh organic corn?
    What about organic corn chips?

  • #2
    If the corn chips are fried in unsaturated oil, that would probably be bad. Though if corn chips are made the traditional way, via nixtamalization, they would probably be better than fresh corn.
    My opinions and some justification

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    • #3
      Here's an article about the history of corn and the nutritional decline of our vegetables in general.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/op...anted=all&_r=0

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      • #4
        Seasonal sweet corn? Go for it! Corn chips? A rare treat. As Elliot says, fried in oil...never a good thing.

        If you wanted to make corn a staple of your diet, use nixtamalized corn flour. Bob's Red Mill sells it as Masa Harina. Damn fine food. American Indians created huge civilizations based on corn as the main food. Nixtamalization involves soaking the corn in limed water then cooking, drying, and grinding. Hominy is the stage prior to drying and grinding, if you like hominy, that's good food, too.

        Nothing wrong with corn, full of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The only thing wrong with corn is the way everyone has eaten it without first nixtamalizing it.

        Sweet corn is a whole other thing. Not really suitable as a main staple, but man, it's good. Best eaten within hours of being picked. Slathered with butter. mmmmm
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Elliot View Post
          If the corn chips are fried in unsaturated oil, that would probably be bad. Though if corn chips are made the traditional way, via nixtamalization, they would probably be better than fresh corn.
          You know of any brand of organic corn chips on the market that is made the traditional way?

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          • #6
            Thanks to all for taking time to reply to my question.

            Originally posted by tatertot View Post
            use nixtamalized corn flour. Bob's Red Mill sells it as Masa Harina. Damn fine food. American Indians created huge civilizations based on corn as the main food. Nixtamalization involves soaking the corn in limed water then cooking, drying, and grinding. Hominy is the stage prior to drying and grinding, if you like hominy, that's good food, too.

            Nothing wrong with corn, full of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The only thing wrong with corn is the way everyone has eaten it without first nixtamalizing it.
            Sweet corn is a whole other thing. Not really suitable as a main staple, but man, it's good. Best eaten within hours of being picked. Slathered with butter. mmmmm
            Do you know if Bob's Red Mill's Masa Harina is made from organic corn or GMO corn?

            What is the reason that nixtamalized corn is better than fresh raw organic corn?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by coolrain View Post
              You know of any brand of organic corn chips on the market that is made the traditional way?
              Honestly, I have no idea. Every brand of corn chips I find is made with bad oils, so I stop reading right there.
              My opinions and some justification

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              • #8
                there is very little gmo corn in the us food supply. almost all of it is field corn used to feed livestock or make other corn products like hfcs.

                in-season, i but fresh, local corn and eat it without regret. our season is still a few months away though!
                As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                – Ernest Hemingway

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                • #9
                  From Bob's website (does not appear to be organic, but as noodle said, there is no GMO corn used for food, which I am pretty sure is a true statement.

                  Masa, the Spanish word for “dough,” is the traditional dough used to make corn tortillas. It is made with hominy, or dried corn kernels that have been cooked and soaked in limewater, which is ground into masa. Masa harina (“dough flour”) is flour made from dried masa. The nixtamalization process (soaking in limewater) was developed in Mesoamerica thousands of years ago. It loosens the hulls from the kernel and softens the corn for grinding by breaking down the glue-like component called hemicellulose. This process also changes the structure of the corn, freeing the nutritionally rich niacin so that it can be easily absorbed into the digestive track. In addition, calcium is gained from the lime used as an alkali. The nixtamalization process also balances the amino acids, accessing more usable protein from the corn. Masa harina is most commonly used to make tortillas, but it is also featured in other delicious dishes including tamales, pupusas, and arepas.
                  Here's an organic certified masa harina.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                    You know of any brand of organic corn chips on the market that is made the traditional way?
                    Including any dry oily pulverized grain product on PB is a stretch. I would stick to the produce department.
                    37//6'3"/185

                    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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                    • #11
                      Here's something even better than greasy tortillas: Corn Dodgers!
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by picklepete View Post
                        Including any dry oily pulverized grain product on PB is a stretch. I would stick to the produce department.
                        I actually don't eat corn chips or any processed food. It is my dear sister who loves corns and corn chips and I am trying to find one brand that will be a lesser evil

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                        • #13
                          Tatertot, thank you so much for the info. on organic masa harina and corn dodgers. I am getting out my dust-gathering tortilla maker this moment.

                          Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                          there is very little gmo corn in the us food supply. almost all of it is field corn used to feed livestock or make other corn products like hfcs.

                          in-season, i but fresh, local corn and eat it without regret. our season is still a few months away though!
                          Thanks for the information. I always thought almost all fresh non-organic corns in grocers are GMO.
                          Last edited by coolrain; 05-17-2016, 01:17 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                            I always thought almost all fresh non-organic corns in grocers are GMO.
                            It's hard to say: Corn GMO Info

                            Unbeknownst to the majority of consumers, in the summer of 2012 large quantities of GMO sweet corn appeared on grocery store shelves and roadside produce stands. In 2011, Monsanto announced plans to grow genetically modified sweet corn on 250,000 acres, roughly accounting for 40 percent of the sweet corn market. The sweet corn is being used for frozen and canned corn products, and it is also available fresh across the country.

                            In 2013, Friends of the Earth released a first-of-its-kind study tracking the prevalence of GMO sweetcorn and brought us some good news! According to the study, out of 71 samples of fresh, frozen and canned corn tested from around the United States, only two of those tested positive (both were confirmed to be Monsanto Seminis® Performance Series™ sweet corn).

                            Here are key facts you need to know:

                            What?
                            GMO sweet corn is genetically engineered to be herbicide resistant (Roundup Ready) and to produce its own insecticide (Bt Toxin). Like all GMOs, genetically modified sweet corn has not been thoroughly tested to ensure that it is safe for consumption.

                            Who?
                            While GMO sweet corn has been produced in the past by Syngenta, this is the first attempt by a biotech company to corner the sweet corn market.

                            Where?
                            GMO sweet corn can be found in the produce aisle of your local food store and at farmers’ markets and farmstands. It can also be found in processed foods that contain sweet corn

                            How can I keep GMO sweet corn off my plate?
                            All of the Non-GMO Project Verified sweet corn is listed here; however, if you can’t find a Verified version, eating Certified Organic sweet corn is a great way to protect you and your family from this experimental food. Under the regulations of the National Organic Program, Certified Organic farmers are not allowed to knowingly plant GMO seed. Learn more about all of the benefits of Certified Organic here.

                            I want to do more. Any suggestions?

                            Read our blog, “GMO Sweet Corn–Anything but Sweet” for ideas on how to take action
                            Leave a note at your local farmstand or farmers’ market explaining your concerns about GMO sweet corn. Download a letter template for farmers
                            Speak with your local retailer and share the retailer sweet corn flyer. Download the retailer flyer (PDF)
                            Check out the Friends of the Earth article and study.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                              I actually don't eat corn chips or any processed food. It is my dear sister who loves corns and corn chips and I am trying to find one brand that will be a lesser evil
                              Ah that's a challenge. When I was a chip junkie I never thought they tasted much like corn--I just needed no-prep no-utensil energy + salt (knowing nothing about nutrition). If a cup of frozen sweet corn with butter & salt scratches her itch, that could be a step up.
                              37//6'3"/185

                              My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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