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Applying primal eating to flexible intermittent fasting dieting method

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  • Applying primal eating to flexible intermittent fasting dieting method

    Hey primal friends. For the past 4 years, I've been testing different fasting protocols. I've read the ones Mark talked aboutin the past.

    But the best fat loss results I got were with my flexible intermittent fasting method.

    I literally tried all of them. But adding flexibility to IF is like an upgraded dieting method. Not only that but it works wonders with a primal eating lifestyle.

    Here’s the brutal truth about intermittent fasting for weight loss: there are too many people that think it is the be all end all solution to weight loss when in fact it is just a simple dieting strategy.

    And of course… all these fat loss “experts” are telling people: just fast, don’t eat for this many hours, and you’ll lose weight.

    I wish it would be that easy.

    Today I’m going to show you how I lost 19.8 pounds in just 8 weeks using a technique I’ve been tweaking for the last 4 years. Not only that but I also went down to around 6% bodyfat.

    And I was able to drop all these pounds despite working full-time, getting out on weekends with my friends, and traveling through my country. All with the help of my new method.

    Keep reading…

    There are 5 simple steps to using the FIF technique:
    1. Create your FIF fasting window
    2. Transition From Your Normal Eating To FIF Eating
    3. Break The Fast With Slowly Digesting Whole Foods (And My Personal Food List)
    4. Start The FIF Feasting Window (eat your way into fat loss FIF style)
    5. Close The FIF Eating Window


    Here’s how I did it step by step:

    Step 1 – Create Your FIF Fasting Window

    Here’s the deal:

    Normal IF protocols suggest a fixed fasting, and eating window. The most common IF protocol requires you to fast for 16 hours. After that, you can eat in the next 8 hours. Repeat that over and over again.

    My protocol is different:

    The daily fasting window has to contain least 15 hours of fast from the last meal you had, and it can go up to 24 hours. With the exception of certain days or life conditions, you can get away with increasing the fasting window up to 36 hours. I don’t recommend frequent 36-hour fasting windows if you have a low percent bodyfat.

    For you to understand the concept of the FIF fasting window setup, I took a 3-day example from a journal I made back when I first tried FIF:

    Sunday:

    8:27 AM –Woke up, went to fridge, had a quick snack, went to work
    11:52 AM – My first real meal
    14:12 PM – A snack
    18:26 PM – A huge meal consisting of meat, vegetables, and rice
    22:00 PM – My last meal of the day

    Monday:

    8:03 AM – Got up and ready for work
    14:12 PM – Took my first meal of the day (I fasted from 22:00 PM last night, up to 14:12 this day for a total of 16h and 9 min)
    16:56 PM – Took my pre-workout shake
    17:30 PM – Bodybuilding workout session
    19:00 PM – Ate the last meal of the day

    Tuesday:

    9:00 AM – Woke up, calculated my next meal
    12:37 AM – Took my first meal (I fasted from 19:00PM last night, up to 11:37PM this day for a total of 17h and 37 min)
    14:12 PM – Ate a snack
    18:03 PM – Ate my per-workout meal
    18:48 PM – Bodybuilding workout session
    20:00 PM – Ate my last meal of the day

    The main rule to apply is this one:

    Your daily fasting window has to fall between 15 to 24 hours (with the possibility to extend it to 36 maximum hours).

    Step 2 – Maintain Your Fasting Window For At Least 15 Hours

    Fasting might be impossible for some people at first. There’s a period of adaptation to fasting that can range from 3 to 10 days. It was hard for me when I first tried it.

    I was used to a frequent eating. This meant my hunger hormones were conditioned to send responses to my brain every 2-3 hours. That meant I was hungry every 2-3 hours. I used to eat a big breakfast, take a few snacks until my next meal, and so on.

    Step 3 – Break The Fast With Slowly Digesting Whole Foods

    Always focus on whole foods when you break the fast.

    Food selection wise, there’s just one simple rule: If it fits your lifestyle, by all means eat that food. I like to simplify this approach as IIFYL.

    Step 4 – Start The FIF Feasting Window (eat your way into fat loss FIF style)

    You can start the FIF feasting window after the minimum period of 15 hours of fast have passed.

    Step 5 – Close The FIF Eating Window

    You can close the eating window whenever you want to.

    For example, if you start your feasting window at 12:00PM, you have until 21:00PM to decide when to close it.

    You can close it even with 1 hour before you go to sleep. But you have to take your fasting window into consideration. For example, if you close your eating window at 02:00 AM, the next fasting window should go on until 17:00 PM next day. Why 17:00 PM?

    02:00 AM + the minimum of 15 hours = your next meal should be at 17:00 PM.

    CLOSING THOUGHTS

    This is a short summary of the Flexible intermittent fasting method. The original one is way too long to paste it here but you can read it here: http://getfitmindset.com/intermitten...r-weight-loss/

    Lastly, I want to hear back from you. Have you tried fasting? What's your opinion about FIF?
    Last edited by Marinas Florin; 06-17-2016, 05:04 AM.
    I am not a bodybuilding/fat loss/strength training "guru" BUT I achieved a lean state with ease after learning the correct way to train and eat and I want to HELP YOU achieve the same.

    Getting fit is also about managing your mindset:
    http://getfitmindset.com

  • #2
    I've tried fasting and love it; however, the make or break it with people is where their blood sugar is basically sitting at the time of the fast. This is where the flexibility comes in because people need to really listen to their body when it comes to fasting and eating in general. There are times when you need food and lots of it, and times when you don't.

    If someone's blood sugar is low or lower than it should be, cortisol starts to rise to compensate for this, this is what keeps people alive. If someone attempts to fast during this state, cortisol rises very rapidly, your testosterone gets suppressed, and your thyroid starts to slow down dragging your metabolism down with it. Now there is an advantage to this that Mark pointed out back in 2010 I believe, the slowing down your thyroid is more than likely linked to extended life. Think of us like a light bulb, we burn brighter, we die quicker; dim us by slowing down our metabolism, we live longer.

    Going back to low blood sugar and rapidly elevated cortisol, it basically makes your body cling to fat, and you'll end up burning off muscle tissue in it's place. This is obviously what people don't want, so they need to understand where they sit before they attempt any type of IF. The body will give tell tale signs like cold hands and feet followed by general lethargy and the feeling of being run down, this is when you don't want to IF.

    Now things that will cause someone to feel run down are not eating enough, exercising too much, not sleeping enough, or just general too much stress. These are times when IF should be shelved. If however you are feeling good, rested and alert, this is where IF will start to benefit.

    In a nutshell, FIF is how it should be looked at, flexible in the idea that people need to listen to how they feel in regards to their actual work/life/exercise schedule, rather than looking at it as a fixed window.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think this is a really good plan for the people who find it hardest to lose body fat. Some people seem to be fighting against themselves when they eat many times each day due to inappropriate hormone/insulin signalling. There is a subset of people who simply have to try harder than others to keep their weight in check, and counting calories simply does not hack it.

      I have been the champion of a thing called the "potato hack." People often find they can lose extremely stubborn fat by eating just potatoes for a few days at a time. A variance of the basic hack, is to eat potatoes for breakfast and lunch and a normal dinner. Folks who try this tell me they are losing weight like never before, and even eating bigger dinners than usual. It almost seems that potatoes (plain, no oil or sauces) effect the body differently than a mixed meal of fats, meats, and other plant fibers.

      Definitely in the FIF plan you lay out, the flexibility is the key. Some people hate potatoes, or cannot eat them for some reason. When I discuss dieting with these folks, I sometimes ask them to try one meal a day, usually dinner, and they find that they are able to drop body fat. Many people find this an amazing discovery, and they can eat more in a 2-4 hour eating window than they were previously eating all day long, and still lose weight.

      There are several diets out there that capitalize on this, the Warrior Diet (Ori Hofmekler) and the Wild Diet (Abel James). Both of these diets are created as mini-industries for the authors, getting you hooked on special supplements, regimens, apps, and "systems."

      The truth is that you should not try to go "low carb" or whatever, but simply eat real food and avoid processed crap. Eating once a day following a lengthy fast is a really good way to lose weight.
      Find me on Facebook!

      Comment


      • #4
        As tatertot suggests, there is nothing new under the sun about IF. Warrior diet, Leptin reset, insulin sensitivity reset, etc. Your personal tweaks may be good, or they may not be important. I suspect the latter, and without good, scientific testing, it will just be conjecture.

        I think that keeping eating to within an 8 or 9 hour window is healthy, if sometimes uncomfortable. I've done it for several months, and yes, my blood sugar levels improved (I'm sorta kinda pre-diabetic.) Besides fighting through that morning hunger, I found it impossible to adhere to if I visited family or Mexico.

        I think that for T2 diabetics who choose to eat carbs, keeping the carbs in a window is a lot better than spreading them out over the usual 12 or more hours. Give the pancreas a rest.

        If one can't/won't do 24 hour or multi-day fasting, IF is a great alternative.

        Comment


        • #5
          I just eat once a day. Works great for me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by WestCoastFire View Post
            I've tried fasting and love it; however, the make or break it with people is where their blood sugar is basically sitting at the time of the fast. This is where the flexibility comes in because people need to really listen to their body when it comes to fasting and eating in general. There are times when you need food and lots of it, and times when you don't.

            If someone's blood sugar is low or lower than it should be, cortisol starts to rise to compensate for this, this is what keeps people alive. If someone attempts to fast during this state, cortisol rises very rapidly, your testosterone gets suppressed, and your thyroid starts to slow down dragging your metabolism down with it. Now there is an advantage to this that Mark pointed out back in 2010 I believe, the slowing down your thyroid is more than likely linked to extended life. Think of us like a light bulb, we burn brighter, we die quicker; dim us by slowing down our metabolism, we live longer.

            Going back to low blood sugar and rapidly elevated cortisol, it basically makes your body cling to fat, and you'll end up burning off muscle tissue in it's place. This is obviously what people don't want, so they need to understand where they sit before they attempt any type of IF. The body will give tell tale signs like cold hands and feet followed by general lethargy and the feeling of being run down, this is when you don't want to IF.

            Now things that will cause someone to feel run down are not eating enough, exercising too much, not sleeping enough, or just general too much stress. These are times when IF should be shelved. If however you are feeling good, rested and alert, this is where IF will start to benefit.

            In a nutshell, FIF is how it should be looked at, flexible in the idea that people need to listen to how they feel in regards to their actual work/life/exercise schedule, rather than looking at it as a fixed window.
            Indeed. That's also my reasoning here. Although research shows that even with extended fasting, muscle mass loss is not quite there. Provided that your protein intake is adequate, and calories are not extremely restricted.

            FIF just makes fasting a way lot easier than anything else out there.

            Originally posted by tatertot View Post
            I think this is a really good plan for the people who find it hardest to lose body fat. Some people seem to be fighting against themselves when they eat many times each day due to inappropriate hormone/insulin signalling. There is a subset of people who simply have to try harder than others to keep their weight in check, and counting calories simply does not hack it.

            I have been the champion of a thing called the "potato hack." People often find they can lose extremely stubborn fat by eating just potatoes for a few days at a time. A variance of the basic hack, is to eat potatoes for breakfast and lunch and a normal dinner. Folks who try this tell me they are losing weight like never before, and even eating bigger dinners than usual. It almost seems that potatoes (plain, no oil or sauces) effect the body differently than a mixed meal of fats, meats, and other plant fibers.

            Definitely in the FIF plan you lay out, the flexibility is the key. Some people hate potatoes, or cannot eat them for some reason. When I discuss dieting with these folks, I sometimes ask them to try one meal a day, usually dinner, and they find that they are able to drop body fat. Many people find this an amazing discovery, and they can eat more in a 2-4 hour eating window than they were previously eating all day long, and still lose weight.

            There are several diets out there that capitalize on this, the Warrior Diet (Ori Hofmekler) and the Wild Diet (Abel James). Both of these diets are created as mini-industries for the authors, getting you hooked on special supplements, regimens, apps, and "systems."

            The truth is that you should not try to go "low carb" or whatever, but simply eat real food and avoid processed crap. Eating once a day following a lengthy fast is a really good way to lose weight.
            As a proponent of dieting that fits your lifestyle, I find my method of fasting to be flexible for anyone's lifestyle. That's why I believe that any type of dieting can be applied to this strategy.

            Potatoes? Sure, why not.
            A high protein based diet, why not?
            Primal, vegan, etc.

            Any kind of dieting will work fine as long as you stick to your lifestyle.

            Originally posted by OnTheBayou View Post
            As tatertot suggests, there is nothing new under the sun about IF. Warrior diet, Leptin reset, insulin sensitivity reset, etc. Your personal tweaks may be good, or they may not be important. I suspect the latter, and without good, scientific testing, it will just be conjecture.

            I think that keeping eating to within an 8 or 9 hour window is healthy, if sometimes uncomfortable. I've done it for several months, and yes, my blood sugar levels improved (I'm sorta kinda pre-diabetic.) Besides fighting through that morning hunger, I found it impossible to adhere to if I visited family or Mexico.

            I think that for T2 diabetics who choose to eat carbs, keeping the carbs in a window is a lot better than spreading them out over the usual 12 or more hours. Give the pancreas a rest.

            If one can't/won't do 24 hour or multi-day fasting, IF is a great alternative.
            Originally posted by Artiepoo View Post
            I just eat once a day. Works great for me.
            I agree that most of that's out there about intermittent fasting isn't new.

            My approach is not necessarily capitalizing on something new. But exposing the possibility of using intermittent fasting in a new and more comfortable way.

            Basically, you can use IF without having fixed eating windows.
            You can tweak it after your lifestyle with some simple suggestions I layed out

            This is the same strategy I used to successfully lose 19.8 pounds in 8 weeks and go down to under 8% bodyfat.

            And I maintained that with ease using the FIF method.
            I am not a bodybuilding/fat loss/strength training "guru" BUT I achieved a lean state with ease after learning the correct way to train and eat and I want to HELP YOU achieve the same.

            Getting fit is also about managing your mindset:
            http://getfitmindset.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Marinas Florin View Post

              CLOSING THOUGHTS

              This is a short summary of the Flexible intermittent fasting method. The original one is way too long to paste it here but you can read it here: http://getfitmindset.com/intermitten...r-weight-loss/

              Lastly, I want to hear back from you. Have you tried fasting? What's your opinion about FIF?
              Can you break a fast with spam...it is quite tasty?
              Last edited by Artbuc; 06-17-2016, 06:55 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Its not spam if it contributes to the Primal conversation IMO. This isn't just a link to some offshoot website. It is a well thought out post and the OP has continued to respond in this forum to forum questions.

                Just my opinion, but for me spam has a whole different meaning.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                  Its not spam if it contributes to the Primal conversation IMO. This isn't just a link to some offshoot website. It is a well thought out post and the OP has continued to respond in this forum to forum questions.

                  Just my opinion, but for me spam has a whole different meaning.
                  After I clicked the links, I thought, "Oh, crap, I just replied to spam." And his website does look at bit commercialized, with before and after pics that look too hard to believe.

                  But, on reading, and gleaning what I could without signing up or paying, I see that "Flo" has a nice plan laid out that could help lots of people. Basically, his idea is to try to eat after a 20 hour fast as often as possible, not sweating the days when you cannot. This is sort of like Mark Sisson's 80/20 rule for Primal eating, but with IF'ing.

                  I think the 20 hour IF period is going to prove better at fat loss than the typical IF of ~16 hours. It forces one to skip an entire meal period and keeps the insulin "area under the curve" much lower. I'm starting to understand that a certain segment of the overweight can greatly benefit from keeping insulin levels restrained. I have never liked long-term keto/VLC diets as I think they are too restrictive and lead to gut dysbiosis. The secret of keto/VLC seems to be simply in keeping insulin production chronically lowered. This 'FIF' plan will also keep insulin greatly lowered, but allows a meal of any composition one would like, I'd recommend the meal be "well-balanced" with a good portion of meat, dairy, lots of plants, starches, and high in fiber. Some heavy-hitter polyphenols should be included (berries, dark choc), and the meal is a good time to take your fat-soluble supplements if you partake (fish oil, vit D, etc.).

                  I should think that for initial weight loss, a period of 20 hour fasting for several months should get people down to a goal weight, and periodic 20 hour fasts should be good for maintenance. The big caveat here is: This will only work well for people whose problem is excess insulin.

                  There are many faces of obesity and fat storage patterns. I do not think everyone will respond to once-a-day eating. Other hormones may be at play that require more frequent meals and paying attention to different aspects of diet and metabolism. Hormonal imbalances in estrogen, testosterone, leptin, etc. may be the root of some people's problems.

                  For people who struggle to drop weight, once-a-day eating might be the golden ticket. For the genetically gifted who do not store fat like others, this method would work well for cutting body fat to very low levels as Flo is using it.

                  The before and after pictures of Flo are a bit deceptive, but at least he is honest about it. He ate purposely to gain weight, took some unflattering "before" shots, then IF'd his way to low body fat for the "after."

                  I have to give Flo some credit, he had a good idea, played with it for several years and tried it out on his friends, then built a program around it to make some money for himself. Who wouldn't like a job like that? It will only work if his clients get results, and he seems to have given away the "tldr" spoilers in the free section, and even in this post he did here. I think it's all kind of cool.
                  Find me on Facebook!

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