Ad Widget

Collapse

Avoiding Sun Exposure is as Deadly as Smoking

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    FWIW, I've read astaxanthin prevents a lot of sun damage in skin; so I'd presume a high antioxidant intake would be protective of both inside and outside of a person.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by coolrain View Post
      If sunlight is anti-aging, how come those who spend much time outdoors get premature face wrinkles and many unsightly dark sun spots all over their exposed arms and backs? How come, in the same person, the skin that is normally exposed to the sun (such as face & backsides of hands) ages much much faster than the skin that is not? I read that sunlight is responsible for 80% of skin aging. From observation, I agree with that statement.
      Honestly I haven't noticed this at all. Usually I see those that are tanned and in the sun frequently have very healthy looking skin. Guess my observations don't correlate with yours. Maybe like some stated above you are looking at previous or current smokes and/or those with poor other lifestyle factors.
      Last edited by Neckhammer; 06-30-2016, 09:07 AM.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by ToldUzo View Post
        Probably because there is such a thing as too much sun exposure (plus it depends on the wavelenght). Also many people with wrinkles are/have been smokers which ages the skin badly.
        But too Little sun exposure is bad for health. Gotta find the sweet spot!
        As much as I love to sunbathe, I find that simply laying and baking in the sun produces skin that looks much more potato-ey than I would prefer. But moving, working, gardening, swimming, etc produces a really nice "even tan" that so many people are after, and it doesn't seem to produce so many wrinkles (at least, it doesn't seem to produce so many so quickly) and I wonder if the movement itself produces areas of shade (for your body) that gives your skin a break.
        I have no evidence or proof and don't even know if it's true, but it's just my own n=1 that I've noticed in the past few years. I rather enjoy NOT looking like a deep fried leather hand bag

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
          Honestly I haven't noticed this at all. Usually I see those that are tanned and in the sun frequently have very healthy looking skin. Guess my observations don't correlate with yours. Maybe like some stated above you are looking at previous or current smokes and/or those with poor other lifestyle factors.
          It's like anything, it can be overdone.

          Some years ago for quite awhile my best friend was black. His ex-wife and her sister would not date white men. Had a thing. They listen only to black radio, and laid out in the sun as much as they could. The wanted to look black, too. By age forty their faces were similar to alligator's skin.

          Ironically, if you look at the faces of black women, they age very, very slowly. Remembering that I'm 70, my gf two years ago was black, age 63, and without exaggeration she could have passed for 35. Hardly a white hair, even.

          Comment


          • #20
            I have been supplementing vitamin D3 for about a year. I was traveling for three weeks in April and got a lot more sun than I usually do. I wore sunscreen and a hat, but I still got a tan on my face and neck. Those areas are still darker than the rest of me. In the past, I would always burn and peel. I attribute the difference to the vitamin D. Now the advice to ramp up sun exposure gradually makes sense to me. Someone using the sun alone would be bootstrapping — slowly building up the D (and whatever else comes with that) and getting some resistance.
            I moved to primalforums.com to escape the spam.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by sharperhawk View Post
              I have been supplementing vitamin D3 for about a year. I was traveling for three weeks in April and got a lot more sun than I usually do. I wore sunscreen and a hat, but I still got a tan on my face and neck. Those areas are still darker than the rest of me. In the past, I would always burn and peel. I attribute the difference to the vitamin D. Now the advice to ramp up sun exposure gradually makes sense to me. Someone using the sun alone would be bootstrapping — slowly building up the D (and whatever else comes with that) and getting some resistance.
              I think you discovered the "more Vitamin D reduces sun's damages" effect. I've been supp'ing D for 7 years, ramping up to 10,000 IU's daily. (Interestingly, my blood serum D has dropped over the years. From very high but OK to nice normal, better than most, still. I attribute that either to aging, or perhaps the body is self regulating to excellent but normal.) I noticed that compared to when I was young, I can't/don't get as dark. But I never, ever use sunscreen except on my nose with rosacea, and I always have a clean dermatological bill of health. Many hours in the Florida sun, yard work and biking to the beaches.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                If sunlight is anti-aging, how come those who spend much time outdoors get premature face wrinkles and many unsightly dark sun spots all over their exposed arms and backs? How come, in the same person, the skin that is normally exposed to the sun (such as face & backsides of hands) ages much much faster than the skin that is not? I read that sunlight is responsible for 80% of skin aging. From observation, I agree with that statement.
                Time of day is the determining factor. The damaging effects of UV-B from late morning to mid-afternoon are well documented, although moderate exposure elevates vitamin D. Early morning exposure to infrared sunlight is anti-inflammatory and late morning exposure up to 10 AM to high UV-A stimulates daytime hormonal release that increases energy output. After 10 AM, the UV-B exposure needs to be carefully monitored, especially by fair skinned and other sensitive types.
                Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
                Old Paths ... New Journeys

                Comment


                • #23
                  Thanks for sharing this information.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X