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  • sesame seeds

    Are sesame seeds, raw and soaked and then dehydrated, OK? Can they be eaten in good quantity daily as a major source of calcium and iron?
    Since dairy and soy are frowned upon, I have problems finding good source of calcium. Greens don't contain much calcium. I would have to eat 7 pounds of greens a day to take in enough amount of calcium!

  • #2
    There's always good ol' homemade bone broth to fill in a gap. Don't neglect magnesium or K2. Most red meats will supply enough heme iron to fill your needs. Heme iron is more useful to the mammalian body than vegetarian iron. Maybe you're not as lacking as you think. Mo opinion on sesame seeds, other than I used to love them toasted.

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    • #3
      I would avoid sesame seeds. They have a significant amount of polyunsaturated fat.
      My opinions and some justification

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      • #4
        trying to get enough minerals from seeds or leaves is a fool's game. you need vast quantities and neither provide heme iron which is vital.

        dairy is a personal choice -- sisson is fine with it if you tolerate it. calcium can also be had from canned sardines or salmon with bones and all other trace minerals present in sufficient quantity in meats and shellfish.
        As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

        – Ernest Hemingway

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Paysan View Post
          There's always good ol' homemade bone broth to fill in a gap. Don't neglect magnesium or K2. Most red meats will supply enough heme iron to fill your needs. Heme iron is more useful to the mammalian body than vegetarian iron. Maybe you're not as lacking as you think. Mo opinion on sesame seeds, other than I used to love them toasted.
          The bone broth does not have much calcium. My main concern is calcium. I eat red meat so iron is not a big problem.
          Last edited by coolrain; 10-02-2016, 02:38 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Elliot View Post
            I would avoid sesame seeds. They have a significant amount of polyunsaturated fat.
            If sesame seeds are raw/soaked/dehydrated at a low temperature, they don't become rancid and their polyunsaturated fat won't be a problem, right?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
              trying to get enough minerals from seeds or leaves is a fool's game. you need vast quantities and neither provide heme iron which is vital.

              dairy is a personal choice -- sisson is fine with it if you tolerate it. calcium can also be had from canned sardines or salmon with bones and all other trace minerals present in sufficient quantity in meats and shellfish.
              The problem is a family member tested positive (allergic) on dairy. As for canned salmon/sardine, I always have the suspicion that the high-heat or high-pressure used to make the bones so soft is making fish's delicate omega 3 fat rancid.
              Last edited by coolrain; 10-02-2016, 02:37 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                If sesame seeds are raw/soaked/dehydrated at a low temperature, they don't become rancid and their polyunsaturated fat won't be a problem, right?
                Your body is a great environment for polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation. Even if they don't become rancid before you eat them, they probably will afterward.
                My opinions and some justification

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                • #9
                  Elliot, thanks for taking time to reply to my questions.

                  May I ask where you get your info.? The following 3 sites all praise PUFA. It is hard to imagine that all the distinguished scientists in these reputable organizations team up to deceive people.

                  This is from Mayo Clinic:
                  Polyunsaturated fatty acids. This is a type of fat found mostly in plant-based foods and oils. Evidence shows that eating foods rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease. These fatty acids may also help decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. Polyunsaturated fatty acids.

                  The following is from Harvard Medical School:
                  http://www.health.harvard.edu/stayin...s-bad-and-good
                  Eating polyunsaturated fats in place of saturated fats or highly refined carbohydrates reduces harmful LDL cholesterol and improves the cholesterol profile. It also lowers triglycerides.
                  Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, flaxseeds, walnuts, canola oil, and unhydrogenated soybean oil.
                  Omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent and even treat heart disease and stroke. In addition to reducing blood pressure, raising HDL, and lowering triglycerides, polyunsaturated fats may help prevent lethal heart rhythms from arising. Evidence also suggests they may help reduce the need for corticosteroid medications in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Studies linking omega-3s to a wide range of other health improvements, including reducing risk of dementia, are inconclusive, and some of them have major flaws, according to a systematic review of the evidence by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
                  Omega-6 fatty acids have also been linked to protection against heart disease. Foods rich in linoleic acid and other omega-6 fatty acids include vegetable oils such as safflower, soybean, sunflower, walnut, and corn oils.
                  Updated: August 7, 2015

                  The following is from American Heart Asso.:
                  Polyunsaturated fats can help reduce bad cholesterol levels in your blood which can lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. They also provide nutrients to help develop and maintain your body’s cells. Oils rich in polyunsaturated fats also contribute vitamin E to the diet, an antioxidant vitamin most Americans need more of.
                  Oils rich in polyunsaturated fats also provide essential fats that your body needs but can’t produce itself – such as omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. You must get essential fats through food. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are important for many functions in the body.
                  http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Health...p#.V_HMAfArLcs

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                    The following 3 sites all praise PUFA. It is hard to imagine that all the distinguished scientists in these reputable organizations team up to deceive people.
                    It isn't that distinguished scientists team up to deceive people. But, it is easy for even distinguished scientists to believe a false premise that distorts their conclusions. In the three examples you cite, the false premise is that lowered cholesterol is "good". Therefore, if PUFA lowers cholesterol, PUFA is "good". Perfect logic, applied to a false premise still yields a false conclusion.

                    I won't try to speak for Elliot, but as a +1 to his statement, PUFA oxidation is a much greater risk to human health than elevated cholesterol numbers. Even if "bad" cholesterol is elevated, there are other natural ways to lower it than with PUFA, such as with niacin.

                    The hazards to heart health associated with elevated cholesterol result from oxidation of cholesterol and calcification at points of arterial damage. Where arterial damage exists, it is natural for cholesterol to collect to "band-aid" the wound. Avoidance of arterial damage is a more appropriate protocol and we can aid that by reducing oxidation, inflammation and calcification. Reducing PUFA intake, in general, and especially that of omega-6 is a good place to start reducing oxidation and inflammation..
                    Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
                    Old Paths ... New Journeys

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                      Elliot, thanks for taking time to reply to my questions.

                      May I ask where you get your info.? The following 3 sites all praise PUFA. It is hard to imagine that all the distinguished scientists in these reputable organizations team up to deceive people.
                      I don't get my info from looking up authorities and taking their opinion as fact. I go to the actual evidence, the highest level of which is controlled experiments in humans. Here are some examples:

                      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23386268
                      In this cohort, substituting dietary linoleic acid in place of saturated fats increased the rates of death from all causes, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular disease.
                      http://www.bmj.com/content/353/bmj.i...apid-responses
                      The intervention group had significant reduction in serum cholesterol compared with controls (mean change from baseline −13.8% v −1.0%; P<0.001). Kaplan Meier graphs showed no mortality benefit for the intervention group in the full randomized cohort or for any prespecified subgroup. There was a 22% higher risk of death for each 30 mg/dL (0.78 mmol/L) reduction in serum cholesterol...
                      Trusting authorities like doctors is a good way to hear the conventional wisdom of the day, which may or may not be correct. The most meaningful thing you can read is the evidence itself.
                      My opinions and some justification

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                      • #12
                        John and Elliot, thanks for replies. I have no problem with saturated fats. From my own n=1 experience, saturated fats don't hurt me at all. My confusion is more on the polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation. When I google "polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation", nothing meaningful comes out. The three institutions' publications which I cited do not mention polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation at all. If polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation is so bad, why don't these distinguished scientists at these reputable institutions mention it? If there are reliable controlled experiments in humans concerning "polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation", these scientists cannot be ignorant of these experiments, right?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by coolrain View Post
                          John and Elliot, thanks for replies. I have no problem with saturated fats. From my own n=1 experience, saturated fats don't hurt me at all. My confusion is more on the polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation. When I google "polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation", nothing meaningful comes out. The three institutions' publications which I cited do not mention polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation at all. If polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation is so bad, why don't these distinguished scientists at these reputable institutions mention it? If there are reliable controlled experiments in humans concerning "polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation", these scientists cannot be ignorant of these experiments, right?
                          That's essentially an appeal to authority, which is an invalid argument.

                          You seem to be placing greater significance in scientists than I think they deserve. The science industry is guided by many principles, with the pursuit of truth often being fairly irrelevant. Money and prestige are usually more important. In fact, an editor of the New England Journal of Medicine wrote an article, the title of which is something like "Half of All Published Research Findings Are Probably False." The system is broken and the people inside are basically aware of it, but it's difficult to do much about it.

                          Science can be expensive. If the person performing the research is not also the person funding it, then they have some responsibility to get the result their funders want. If they write a paper that displeases their funders, they probably won't get more funding from that source. Funding is a strong motivator in science.

                          Prestige is also important. If a scientist's entire career consists of making a certain point (eg polyunsaturated fat is good), and the evidence eventually demonstrates this point to be wrong, they probably won't want to admit it, because it makes them look bad. Furthermore, if a scientist says something that strongly challenges the prevailing narrative, they won't get cited by their peers. They may even have trouble getting it published. So peer acceptance is another strong motivator.

                          The head of the American Heart Association did not get there by saying saturated fat is good and polyunsaturated fat is bad. They got there by saying things that agree with the AHA. The AHA already has a stated opinion. For better or worse, they are committed to that opinion.

                          If you are a career scientist, and you find good evidence to support an alternative viewpoint, do you publish it and risk your career? Probably not. Even if you try, it might not get published, or it might only be accepted into a journal so obscure no one reads it. The science industry is not really about the pursuit of truth, so you can't simply take scientists' words as facts. They all have their motives.
                          My opinions and some justification

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                          • #14
                            Thanks, Elliot.
                            I checked out your website. So you think raw dairy is good. Do you eat comte cheese? From the website it appears to me comte cheese is high quality raw cheese. What is your opinion?

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                            • #15
                              Dried figs are high in calcium...if you eat fruits

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