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  • what is a good way to count carbs?

    I know this may seem like a weird question... It's just that I want to spend some time in the 50-100 grams of carbs per day range, but some things are hard to gauge how many carbs they contain. For example, I make these kale shakes that contain 2 stalks of kale, half a cucumber, 2 celery stalks, and a chunk of ginger root (I try to drink daily). These are all raw veggies straight out of the produce section of the grocery store. They don't have a nutrition label or anything of the sort. So how do I know how many carbs this kale drink has? There are other examples too like when I find myself snacking on raw broccoli or cauliflower or baby carrots... How many carbs are in that stuff?

    Thanks in advance for any input on the matter

  • #2
    I use MyFitnessPal, an online tracker. It has data for veggies, meats, etc. It allows you to enter your own recipes and common meals as well, to make tracking easier.

    Good luck!
    Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread114086.html

    "Live in such a way that when others speak evil of you, none will believe it."

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    • #3
      You can find most foods here:

      http://nutritiondata.self.com/

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      • #4
        Ignore the carb content of those fibrous veggies. You can't consume enough of those, anyway, to adversely impact your total carb intake. It's much too much work with too little benefit.

        Instead, if you want to aim for the 50-100g range, count the carbs derived from starches and sugars. Of course, you'll find that the fibrous veggies also have some starches/sugars, but they are so low relative to fiber, that you'll be filled before you consume enough from them to bother counting.
        Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
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        • #5
          Originally posted by John Caton View Post
          Ignore the carb content of those fibrous veggies. You can't consume enough of those, anyway, to adversely impact your total carb intake. It's much too much work with too little benefit.

          Instead, if you want to aim for the 50-100g range, count the carbs derived from starches and sugars. Of course, you'll find that the fibrous veggies also have some starches/sugars, but they are so low relative to fiber, that you'll be filled before you consume enough from them to bother counting.
          x2
          Starchy tubers and pods in produce average about 100g/lb (50g in a typical 8-oz serving). Sweet fruits average about 50g/lb (25g in a typical 8-oz piece, or 1 cup small pieces). There is variance between species but with rotating variety it's accurate. Dried fruits and honey are probably best as a minimal surface garnish.

          IME the watery roots, stalks, buds, leaves, and pods are always "the more the merrier".
          37//6'3"/185

          My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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          • #6
            You wont break 100g with the veggies you have listed.

            A piece of fruit or tuber the size of your fist is approximately 30g of carbs though in my way of doing things. So if I'm counting I just count those. 2-3 servings of that to stay in the 50-100 range.

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            • #7
              I subtract the fiber when I count, so if I'm tracking it's just net carbs. Fiber doesn't impact your blood sugar, which is kind of the point of caring how many carbs you eat.

              Also, if you decide to use the glycemic index to choose between different foods, look for glycemic load instead. It takes into account the fact that most of us will eat two slices of white bread, but not a pound or more of carrots.
              Durp.

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              • #8
                To those who don't count the carbohydrate content of non-starchy vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, zucchini, cabbage, spinach etcetera, would you also advise not bothering to track their calorie count? That would make my life logging my food intake in CRON-O-Meter a lot easier!!!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Orange View Post
                  To those who don't count the carbohydrate content of non-starchy vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, zucchini, cabbage, spinach etcetera, would you also advise not bothering to track their calorie count? That would make my life logging my food intake in CRON-O-Meter a lot easier!!!
                  I don't track at all anymore (I used to), but that's me and I have a defective brain. In my case, all tracking does is make me hyperfocus on food all day long. Which makes me want to eat food all day long. But again, that's me.

                  I will look foods up to see what exactly I'm getting myself into, but then I let it go. If I see an entire head of broccoli has 5 g net carbs (or whatever it is - I don't remember) then I just think "Broccoli is fine, and eating a crapload won't impact me in any way, so it's all good."

                  But like I said, I don't really track. I just look a food up once or twice so I know whether it's a better or worse choice than something else. And that's how I eat - just seeing what there is and making the better choice between A, B, or waiting until there's a better option later on.
                  Durp.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Orange View Post
                    To those who don't count the carbohydrate content of non-starchy vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, zucchini, cabbage, spinach etcetera, would you also advise not bothering to track their calorie count? That would make my life logging my food intake in CRON-O-Meter a lot easier!!!
                    In most cases yes. An individual concerned with excess calories ought to examine the densest foods first then work backwards--it makes no sense to start with the vegetables. Due to the limits of stomach volume the difference between no vegetables and lots of vegetables (~2 pounds) is going to be maybe 2~3% of one's energy budget at most.
                    37//6'3"/185

                    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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