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Is Indian Food Paleo?

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  • #16
    I've heard some/most Indian restaurants use a vegetable oil type ghee instead of the traditional one. I think it's cheaper. There was a story about an Indian restraunteur with the worst arteries. They blamed it on the ghee but failed to mention the ghee wasn't from animals but vegetable oil. This is going by memory I should search it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sue View Post
      I've heard some/most Indian restaurants use a vegetable oil type ghee instead of the traditional one.
      Yes it's called Vanaspati Ghee, or vegetable ghee, it is hydrogenated oil. Stay away, if you find the restaurant uses them. You should probably avoid restaurants mostly because they normally use vegetable oils like the rest of them. Ask around maybe there are some non-health conscious traditional restaurants.

      The grills are the safest things to have. That is what I normally have. I am in India. I rarely eat out.

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      • #18
        the cook at an Indian restaurant I frequent was happy to answer all my questions about ingredients when I explained that I had a bunch of new dietary restrictions "from my doctor." They now make my curry with real ghee instead of veg oil and rice on the side instead of naan (I have a few spoonfulls as part of my 20% and my boyfriend wolfs down the rest).

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        • #19
          Originally posted by moonablaze View Post
          the cook at an Indian restaurant I frequent was happy to answer all my questions about ingredients when I explained that I had a bunch of new dietary restrictions "from my doctor." They now make my curry with real ghee instead of veg oil and rice on the side instead of naan (I have a few spoonfulls as part of my 20% and my boyfriend wolfs down the rest).
          He didn't tell you that you have a wierd doc.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Anand Srivastava View Post
            Yes it's called Vanaspati Ghee, or vegetable ghee, it is hydrogenated oil. Stay away, if you find the restaurant uses them. You should probably avoid restaurants mostly because they normally use vegetable oils like the rest of them. Ask around maybe there are some non-health conscious traditional restaurants.

            The grills are the safest things to have. That is what I normally have. I am in India. I rarely eat out.
            This makes me regret the years I went to Indian restaurants and got the vegan dish. But the baingan bharta was soooo goood.
            Type 1 Diabetic. Controlling blood sugar through primal life.

            2012 Goals:
            Maintain A1c of 6.0 or lower
            More dietary fat, less carbs, moderate protein
            LHT and sprint as per PB fitness
            Play more!

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            • #21
              I would say, hells no, indian food is not paleo. However, you can use indian spices to prepare simply-cooked vegetable or meat dishes at home, in ghee (dairy), but even then, if you use chili powder (nightshade) it's not technically paleo. It's more amenable to something more relaxed like PB though, I think.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by apple View Post
                This makes me regret the years I went to Indian restaurants and got the vegan dish. But the baingan bharta was soooo goood.
                I also love the baigan bharta. We cook it at home with mustard oil. It is the traditional recipe. Mustard oil luckily has a balanced Omega6:Omega3 ratio of 1.4:1. Don't cook it too much and use sparingly, there is nothing much to worry about.

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                • #23
                  I SO want to make this Korma recipe. Korma and Butter Chicken are my favs. If you do dairy, you can make it word-for-word. If not, maybe replace the yogurt with coconut milk. I found it on Jamie Oliver's site:


                  Ingredients:

                  Chicken Korma

                  1.kg Chicken breast or mini breast fillets
                  1 heaped tablespoon of finely grated fresh ginger
                  3 cloves of garlic, minced
                  150g thick (plain) yoghurt
                  1 dried red chilli
                  2 finely chopped onions
                  1 tbsp ghee
                  1 tbsp ground coriander
                  Pinch of ground black pepper
                  1 tsp turmeric
                  1 tsp garam masala
                  water
                  500ml coconut milk
                  some frozen peas
                  1 tsp salt, or to taste
                  3 or 4 tsp sugar or a blob of honey (oops, didn't see this. I'd just use stevia or honey)
                  2 heaped tbsps ground almonds
                  finely chopped Coriander Leaves, to garnish
                  juice of 1/2 lemon or 2 limes

                  Instructions:
                  1. Cut the chicken breasts into largish bite sized chunks
                  2. Mix the chicken with the ginger, garlic and yogurt. Cover and marinade for 12 hours or in the fridge overnight.
                  3. Liquidise the chopped onion and red chillies, add a little water and blend until smooth.
                  4. Heat the ghee in a pan.
                  5. Add the ground coriander, ground black pepper, turmeric and garam masala and stir fry for about 1-minute over a low heat, taking care not to burn them.
                  6. Turn up the heat, add the onion and chilli paste and stir fry for 5 minutes, adding water if necessary.
                  7. Add the chicken and the marinade and continue to stir fry for another 5 minutes.
                  8. Add the coconut milk and enough water to *just* cover the chicken and bring to the boil, stirring until the coconut is dissolved. Stir in the ground almonds and the frozen peas.*
                  9. Reduce heat to low and simmer until the chicken is tender (15 to 20 minutes). Be sure to stir regularly to prevent sticking and burning.
                  10. Remove from heat, add sugar/honey, lemon juice and salt to taste. Mix well.
                  11. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves and serve with steamed rice and a blob of natural yoghurt.
                  Last edited by Phoenixflame; 02-23-2011, 10:41 AM.

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                  • #24
                    shortage of fish in India food is not good

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                    • #25
                      Indian food = metabolic syndrome food. Requires some serious modification to be remotely healthy.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by KimchiNinja View Post
                        Indian food = metabolic syndrome food. Requires some serious modification to be remotely healthy.
                        Mostly because of the polyunsaturated oils they fry their foods in, right? Or are you thinking about the quality of the food they use or something else?
                        Take a walk on the wild side.

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