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  • Struggling to Lose Weight - Help Needed!

    Hi all,

    I am a 27 year old male, 6'2 and currently around 88kg.

    I used to be quite obese in my younger days but I managed to lose that weight and over the years have hovered between 82 and 90kg.

    I think after some years of up and down dieting and fluctuating weight, my metabolism has slowed down (unsure of this but speculating). I have really reduced calories and have exercised a lot and the weight just does not seem to be coming off. I don't just mean the number on the scale either, none of my clothes are any looser either and visually my body still doesn't look great. Lately I've not been feeling particularly hungry either which is quite weird.

    Any tips on how to speed up my metabolism and get out of this funk?

  • #2
    Start weight training/resistance exercise to increase muscle mass. Ditch any hamster on the wheel stuff you are doing. If you are not hungry then don't eat. A day or two without food once in a while is good for us. Other than that be sure to ditch grains, seed oils, and excess carbs. Focus on healthy proteins/fats like eggs and rib eyes for the center piece of your meals.

    Comment


    • #3
      Given that height and weight, you seem to be doing pretty well. Your metabolism has slowed down in the last few years because there is a noticeable decrease in metabolism after you finish growing in your early 20s. It might help to stop looking at the scale for a while. If you track calories and weight loss seems to have stalled, you need to check your portion sizes because people are notoriously bad at estimating those. Also, if tracking calories has worked well for you in the past, make sure that you are tracking everything. A bite of this and a dab of that tends to add up pretty quickly.

      If you want to look better, lift weights. At your age, you'll build muscle rapidly.

      As far as what you should eat, it's pretty simple. Pay attention to hunger signals. Eat food that makes you feel full for the longest but that doesn't trigger the urge to overeat. Bulk up your meals with vegetables. Sugar and fat taste good -- especially together! -- but don't offer much, if any nutritional value for their heavy calorie price. You don't have to be a fanatic about completely avoiding them, but try to make other food more of a priority and save the sugar and fatty things for rare treats.

      Comment


      • #4
        Have you calculated the BMI?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Lafours View Post
          Hi all,

          I am a 27 year old male, 6'2 and currently around 88kg.

          I used to be quite obese in my younger days but I managed to lose that weight and over the years have hovered between 82 and 90kg.

          I think after some years of up and down dieting and fluctuating weight, my metabolism has slowed down (unsure of this but speculating). I have really reduced calories and have exercised a lot and the weight just does not seem to be coming off. I don't just mean the number on the scale either, none of my clothes are any looser either and visually my body still doesn't look great. Lately I've not been feeling particularly hungry either which is quite weird.

          Any tips on how to speed up my metabolism and get out of this funk?

          That's ~194lb ???
          6'2" depending on frame size - wrist, elbow, neck measurements you can be correct weight or over weight and in a way it depends on the reference scale you use.

          Anyway speeding up or slowing metabolism - your body has only one way of regulating it.
          Insulin. Low insulin = high metabolism. High insulin = low metabolism even in the absence of calories.

          You could research this - please do.
          So get your fasting insulin test and compare it to other reference points. Under 2 is very low, under 5 is great with just 12hr fast and 5-10 is sort of OK. Over 10 is bad. More insulin = fat stores are locked away and you can not draw on them and get the calories you need to do things through the day.

          Thanks.
          Srinath.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by srinath_69 View Post


            That's ~194lb ???
            6'2" depending on frame size - wrist, elbow, neck measurements you can be correct weight or over weight and in a way it depends on the reference scale you use.

            Anyway speeding up or slowing metabolism - your body has only one way of regulating it.
            Insulin. Low insulin = high metabolism. High insulin = low metabolism even in the absence of calories.

            You could research this - please do.
            So get your fasting insulin test and compare it to other reference points. Under 2 is very low, under 5 is great with just 12hr fast and 5-10 is sort of OK. Over 10 is bad. More insulin = fat stores are locked away and you can not draw on them and get the calories you need to do things through the day.

            Thanks.
            Srinath.
            I have to disagree with this. Your body has many ways of regulating your metabolic rate. Nearly every hormone has some effect on it. Thyroid hormones, adrenaline, noradrenaline, and androgens all have strong effects. Insulin does, too, and its effect is not necessarily to depress your metabolism. Insulin promotes the storage of fat and also the uptake of carbohydrates. Without insulin, you would be unable to burn glucose, which is the experience diabetics have.

            If you want to raise your metabolic rate, increasing triiodothyronine (T3) is probably the healthiest approach. Glorifying a state of low insulin is essentially glorifying diabetes.
            My opinions and some justification

            Comment


            • #7

              Originally posted by Elliot View Post

              If you want to raise your metabolic rate, increasing triiodothyronine (T3) is probably the healthiest approach. Glorifying a state of low insulin is essentially glorifying diabetes.
              Yes to the complex hormonal dance regarding metabolism, but low insulin is generally a marker (some would say foundation) of good metabolic health.

              Are you thinking of Type 1 Diabetes? much less common and pretty much the opposite insulin situation from Type 2. T1 = no insulin so no fat storage and the glucose levels are sky high because the body can't store the sugar. T2 = too much insulin, cells get resistant to the message, pancreas pumps out even more...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by LinaR View Post


                Yes to the complex hormonal dance regarding metabolism, but low insulin is generally a marker (some would say foundation) of good metabolic health.
                I agree that this is a popular opinion, but I don't agree that it is correct. Insulin is generally associated with feeding. Low insulin is associated with starving. Diabetics (yes, type 1) have low insulin levels, as do people on low-carb diets (a state of glucose pseudo-starvation) and people who are literally starving. I would not consider either diabetics or starvation victims to be particularly good models of health. People can be healthy on low-carb diets, but such diets do not have some sort of monopoly on health.

                High fasting insulin tends to imply insulin resistance, which is bad, but abnormally low insulin indicates starvation, either literally or in the sense of cellular glucose deprivation (eg diabetes). I don't see low insulin as being necessarily good, nor a good goal for one looking to raise their metabolic rate.
                My opinions and some justification

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Elliot View Post
                  I agree that this is a popular opinion, but I don't agree that it is correct. Insulin is generally associated with feeding. Low insulin is associated with starving. Diabetics (yes, type 1) have low insulin levels, as do people on low-carb diets (a state of glucose pseudo-starvation) and people who are literally starving. I would not consider either diabetics or starvation victims to be particularly good models of health. People can be healthy on low-carb diets, but such diets do not have some sort of monopoly on health.

                  High fasting insulin tends to imply insulin resistance, which is bad, but abnormally low insulin indicates starvation, either literally or in the sense of cellular glucose deprivation (eg diabetes). I don't see low insulin as being necessarily good, nor a good goal for one looking to raise their metabolic rate.

                  yes, true mostly, except if you lower insulin drastically, insulin resistance goes with it and the rest of the regulatory hormone dance soon catches up.
                  Starvation etc etc occours after all the reserves have been exhausted or by eating a bit of carbs every 2 hrs. Just enough to kick insulin up but not enough to fuel your body till the next surge.

                  You have control over insulin in a sense with what and when you eat, not on any of the rest of it.

                  Thanks.
                  Srinath.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by srinath_69 View Post


                    yes, true mostly, except if you lower insulin drastically, insulin resistance goes with it and the rest of the regulatory hormone dance soon catches up.
                    If you're implying that insulin resistance is caused by insulin, this is an old fallacy that has never been justified. Philip Randle demonstrated years ago that fatty acids cause insulin resistance (hence the term "The Randle Cycle"). Decreasing insulin would cause a flood of free fatty acids, which would promote insulin resistance. Indeed, this is what we see in long-term starvation and ketogenic diets. Inversely, injecting type 2 diabetics with insulin ("Insulin therapy") temporarily reduces their insulin resistance, probably because the extra insulin inhibits free fatty acid release, giving the existing free fatty acids time to clear out. High fasting insulin is a bad sign, but insulin is not the bad guy.
                    My opinions and some justification

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Elliot View Post
                      If you're implying that insulin resistance is caused by insulin, this is an old fallacy that has never been justified. Philip Randle demonstrated years ago that fatty acids cause insulin resistance (hence the term "The Randle Cycle"). Decreasing insulin would cause a flood of free fatty acids, which would promote insulin resistance. Indeed, this is what we see in long-term starvation and ketogenic diets. Inversely, injecting type 2 diabetics with insulin ("Insulin therapy") temporarily reduces their insulin resistance, probably because the extra insulin inhibits free fatty acid release, giving the existing free fatty acids time to clear out. High fasting insulin is a bad sign, but insulin is not the bad guy.
                      Yes true. Now what happens when you use up and/or excrete all the FFA's - Ketostix turning purple is proof you're dumping these FFA's.
                      That = fat loss, you lose weight and no FFA's left and your insulin resistance drops.

                      You can easily tell your insulin resistance is gone when you eat something high in glucose and in minutes start feeling sleepy.

                      You cant lower insulin for an hour and lose insulin resistance, you need to lower it for days/weeks together over many many months. The FFA's should all be done and dumped and no FFA's for a few weeks+ atleast = Insulin resistance is down.

                      Thanks.
                      Srinath.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by srinath_69 View Post

                        Yes true. Now what happens when you use up and/or excrete all the FFA's
                        Then you die. When you use up all of the fat on your body, you die of starvation.
                        My opinions and some justification

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Its not 1 or 0 my friend. Much like "getting rid of insulin" isn't 0 insulin. Cos then too you'd be dead.
                          OK let me rephrase that. With my numbers as an example.

                          If you have the FFA's and insulin and insulin resistance of a 238lb guy you'd be diabetic.
                          If you drop 100 lb to 138 by fasting for 4-20 day stretches you'd lower insulin to a 138 lb guy (under 1 if fasted more than 3-4 days)
                          You're body has ~10-15 lb fat left. Plenty to flood you with FFA's anytime it wants. Which is better than having the flood from 100lb fat but its flooded none the less. Its like you have less gas in the tank, but still able to run 100mph. Your insulin resistance has stayed almost where it is.
                          If you lose that last 10-15 or significantly lower that to 1-2lb - AKA your tank is beginning to run dry, your body doesn't have the flood of FFA's now.
                          Insulin resistance drops and gradually normalizes to the correct level for a 128 lb guy.

                          The hormone balance gets readjusted to 128, and you hover in that region for years till bad habits push you back to the 238. Hopefully it takes as long as it did the first time (maybe not) but my capacity for food is a lot less as is my ability to tell bad from good food and my activity level is about the same as in my 20's. So maybe it will take a long time.

                          Empty the gas tank of fat and you're dead.
                          Run very very low on fuel so the driver has to drive where he gets better gas mileage = the correct analogy.

                          Thanks.
                          Srinath.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The beauty is as you run very very low on the fat reserves, your body will round up everything else that's in a bit of unhealthy state and sacrifice it. Muscle that's old and decrepit, skin, scars etc etc as well as cancer and other crap that takes up energy without benefitting you will all be burnt.

                            That's called autophagy. This year (2016) the Nobel prize in medicine went to someone who has observed and laid it out.

                            Thanks.
                            Srinath.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by srinath_69 View Post
                              Its not 1 or 0 my friend. Much like "getting rid of insulin" isn't 0 insulin. Cos then too you'd be dead.
                              OK let me rephrase that. With my numbers as an example...Empty the gas tank of fat and you're dead.
                              Run very very low on fuel so the driver has to drive where he gets better gas mileage = the correct analogy.

                              Thanks.
                              Srinath.
                              Bodyweight is not the only variable that affects insulin resistance. Nutritional variables, like magnesium, are strongly involved. The gut microbiota is also a major variable. Insulin resistance can sometimes be cured simply by replacing the gut flora with more favorable species, or by sterilizing the gut entirely.

                              People should maintain a healthy figure, but if a person of ideal weight is still insulin resistant, shrinking further to become underweight is a dangerous solution.

                              Originally posted by srinath_69
                              The beauty is as you run very very low on the fat reserves, your body will round up everything else that's in a bit of unhealthy state and sacrifice it. Muscle that's old and decrepit, skin, scars etc etc as well as cancer and other crap that takes up energy without benefitting you will all be burnt.

                              That's called autophagy. This year (2016) the Nobel prize in medicine went to someone who has observed and laid it out.

                              Thanks.
                              Srinath.
                              People who starve to lose weight often have excess baggy skin, which seems to contradict your quoted statement.
                              My opinions and some justification

                              Comment

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