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Eating Like Your Cultural Ancestors As Opposed To Grok

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  • Eating Like Your Cultural Ancestors As Opposed To Grok

    I have known about the "Good Scots Diet" for years but I rediscovered it recently and this time it stimulated a little more interested in my mind. First, it is very primal/paleo-ish. With of course, the exception of their reliance on barley and oats. Granted, not the same barley and oats we eat today but barley and oats, nonetheless.

    I am Scottish. Born and bred in Canada as were my parents but from my grandparents and older my ancestry is from Scotland. And, I didn't know this before, but apparently the Scots were big-boned people. True to form, nearly ALL of my father's family is bigger boned. Not obese, or overweight but just big people. Even the women are bigger. In short they are sturdy stock! Only one of my four grandparents was not Scottish - and he was Irish.

    Anyway, this leads me to the point of this post. How much credence should we give to the diets and the body composition of our more immediate ancestors? I mean, if you look at the Scots that's nearly a thousand years of ancestral dietary history - nothing to sneeze at.

    So, one might wonder if, IF, they could find a source of unbasterdized cereal grains like oats and barley if they could, in fact, be tolerated should they still share the genetic make-up of their ancestors. How do you erase 1000 years of dietary tolerance?

    Of course, this can be true of any culture assuming the human being was still mostly of that gene pool (basically, what I am saying is that the genetic make-up had not been mixed with that of other cultures).

    Thoughts?
    Last edited by Ontario; 10-30-2017, 05:50 AM.
    Moved on over to www.primalforums.com

  • #2
    Most people here make fun of me for saying this. But I eat like my ancestors and I'll be diabetic in weeks. Imagine 30lb of rice. And that covers 1 adult for a month, there is ~5lb vegetables and 5lb spices in addition to that rice. A gal of dairy maybe. That's the monthly intake per head.
    Only way it keeps you from turning diabetic is if you walked 30 miles a day plowing rice fields.

    Comment


    • #3
      I too am primarily Scot, with the original ancestor in the US coming over in the 1700's from Aberdeen and settling in the wilds of South Carolina. Most of the men and women in the family were big people,my Dad was one of 10 children and average in the family height at 6'1". I inherited a batch of short genes from my mother's side and I peaked at 5'10", but I have the big-bones. I laugh that if you just piled up my bones on the scale, they would weigh what the MD's say is my recommended weight.

      Perhaps that's why I have taken to Primal, it is similar to the original Scot diet. However, that great Scottish traditional dish, haggis, really is not to my liking. As a good Scot, I'm a Presbyterian and our church would celebrate Scottish Heritage day with a special service and a luncheon, where haggis was a featured celebratory event. I couldn't stand the stuff.

      On the general question, I'd say that in today's world, most of us are quite mixed in our backgrounds and trying to identify what your ancestors really ate is probably not something most can determine with much accuracy. Primal seems to meet the needs of most of us humans. And of course, there are those like Srinath who knows his background and is an outlier on the traditional food consumption chart.
      Finally have given up on MDA Forum.
      My friends, I'll see ya at primalforums.com where I'm user #4, and we do have a moderator.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think your ancestry would have to be pretty pure blooded - and w/o the genetic changes a SAD diet might make in a generation or two. I think compared to major dietary variables, this is about as nuanced as one might get. And maybe not ever.

        I am of mostly Northern European heritage, sausages, white wine, weinerschnitzel. Oh, wait, there there's my Italian component, pasta, tomatoes, red wine, meatballs.

        My sister did a DNA test and found that we have an unusually high number of Neanderthal genes (Grunt! Grunt!) Does that mean we should eat more mastodon?

        Just eat healthy foods.
        Last edited by OnTheBayou; 10-30-2017, 08:36 AM.

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        • #5
          I tend to agree with the "paleo" hypothesis that 10,000 years of grain agriculture is not sufficient for most of us to be fully adapted to grain as a dietary source vs the hundreds of thousands of years humans spent with little to no amounts of it. With that premise in place I would say that 1,000 years doesn't really seem like much time at all.

          Edit: eating like it was 100 years ago (sans sugar and vegetable oils) is certainly still a step in the right direction though.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Rig D View Post

            Perhaps that's why I have taken to Primal, it is similar to the original Scot diet. However, that great Scottish traditional dish, haggis, really is not to my liking. As a good Scot, I'm a Presbyterian and our church would celebrate Scottish Heritage day with a special service and a luncheon, where haggis was a featured celebratory event. I couldn't stand the stuff.
            My paternal great-grandmother and grandmother used to make haggis. I love the stuff! We have a Great Britain small food grocer in town and they make a delicious haggis sausage - which, if you really know haggis is basically haggis minus the ruminant stomach but packed in intestines. It's very good.

            Moved on over to www.primalforums.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by OnTheBayou View Post

              My sister did a DNA test and found that we have an unusually high number of Neanderthal genes (Grunt! Grunt!) Does that mean we should eat more mastodon?
              This made me laugh. Thanks for the chuckle!

              Moved on over to www.primalforums.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by OnTheBayou View Post
                I think your ancestry would have to be pretty pure blooded - and w/o the genetic changes a SAD diet might make in a generation or two. I think compared to major dietary variables, this is about as nuanced as one might get. And maybe not ever.

                I am of mostly Northern European heritage, sausages, white wine, weinerschnitzel. Oh, wait, there there's my Italian component, pasta, tomatoes, red wine, meatballs.

                My sister did a DNA test and found that we have an unusually high number of Neanderthal genes (Grunt! Grunt!) Does that mean we should eat more mastodon?

                Just eat healthy foods.
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiener_Schnitzel as it originates from Vienna aka Wien.

                +1 on the chuckle.
                "Don't sweat the small stuff and relax about the whole process"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lovebird View Post

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiener_Schnitzel as it originates from Vienna aka Wien.

                  +1 on the chuckle.
                  Which is central Europe not northern

                  Well - I am something like 80-90% Scandinavian (maybe there was a gypsy somewhere in the mix), so I "should" be eating something very much like the Scottish diet - rye/oats (lots of it - actually mostly rye, barley and oats - mostly in the shape of porridge and rye bread), pork, fish, cruciferous veggies (14 different kinds) and tubers... and LOADS of beer - for the kids too off course. I don't know - it sure doesn't feel like it is the best diet for me. But then again - I can't eat oat porridge without sugar on it - it makes me gag... and imaging having porrigde with milk (and nothing else) along with a mug of beer for breakfast doesn't really appeal to me...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DawnHoff View Post
                    Which is central Europe not northern

                    Well - I am something like 80-90% Scandinavian (maybe there was a gypsy somewhere in the mix), so I "should" be eating something very much like the Scottish diet - rye/oats (lots of it - actually mostly rye, barley and oats - mostly in the shape of porridge and rye bread), pork, fish, cruciferous veggies (14 different kinds) and tubers... and LOADS of beer - for the kids too off course. I don't know - it sure doesn't feel like it is the best diet for me. But then again - I can't eat oat porridge without sugar on it - it makes me gag... and imaging having porrigde with milk (and nothing else) along with a mug of beer for breakfast doesn't really appeal to me...


                    I like the Scandinavian or Nordic diet... all kinds of (fatty) fish, rye bread, sourdough bread, berries, cabbage and root veggies...

                    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...t-201511198673
                    "Don't sweat the small stuff and relax about the whole process"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Lactose intolerance is a strong showcase for the impact of recent ancestry. Rates range from over 90% in East Asian populations to ~10% in the British. Too bad my Japanese ancestry seems to overshadow my Northern European ancestry in this regard.

                      Getting back to 1960s levels of obesity would be a huge improvement over today's situation. That's only 50-60 years ago. You can probably use how your grandparents ate when you were a child as a decent model. Or if not your own grandparents, you probably knew someone of that generation whose habits had good results.

                      I moved to primalforums.com to escape the spam.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lovebird View Post



                        I like the Scandinavian or Nordic diet... all kinds of (fatty) fish, rye bread, sourdough, berries, cabbage and root veggies...

                        https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...t-201511198673
                        But if you go back 100 years it is very very much porridge... 2-3 times a day... and barley porridge is the stuff that give my parent's generation nightmares...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DawnHoff View Post

                          Which is central Europe not northern

                          ..
                          Picking nits, there. Culturally, Austria looks north, not south across the Alps. They speak German, cook German, etc. I've had a German gf and an Austrian gf. Both drop dead beautiful. No difference. Ha ha ha.

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                          • #14

                            Originally posted by sharperhawk View Post
                            Lactose intolerance is a strong showcase for the impact of recent ancestry. Rates range from over 90% in East Asian populations to ~10% in the British. Too bad my Japanese ancestry seems to overshadow my Northern European ancestry in this regard.

                            Getting back to 1960s levels of obesity would be a huge improvement over today's situation. That's only 50-60 years ago. You can probably use how your grandparents ate when you were a child as a decent model. Or if not your own grandparents, you probably knew someone of that generation whose habits had good results.

                            Wow! That graph is truly shocking! I mean, look around - go into a Walmart and you can see it. But to have it plotted on a graph.....yikes!

                            Moved on over to www.primalforums.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If I ate like my British grandmother, I'd have been dead years ago. Ditto my German forebears. Low carb is the only reason I'm still here. Getting bread out of my diet likely saved my life.

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