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  • #31
    Kombucha

    Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
    My first ferments always take at least 14 days and I have a heat strip. 28 days seems excessive, but not unheard of. 5-7 days seems way too short. The booch masters say give it ten days before you even try it.

    What ratio tea to sugar did you use?

    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
    Mine really tastes like it is done after 5-7 days. I think that if I let it go 14 days, I would have vinegar. I would think that bacteria-wise, it is probably better to have it brewing longer though. I wonder if I am not using enough sugar. I use 1 cup of sugar per gallon, I think. Do you think this is enough? I am always worried about using too much sugar and it not getting eaten up. I used to have problems with Candida when I was younger so I definitely cannot have it too sugary. Also, my scoby is very thick. Please let me know what you think.

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    • #32
      No, one cup of sugar per gallon is exactly what I do. I think that is perfect.


      Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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      • #33
        I do 1 cup per half gallon, and I still get a VERY tart booch, so I don't think you need to worry about the SCOBY not using up the sugar. If it is there, it will eat it, given the time.

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        • #34
          I used 1 gallon of water, 1 c white sugar and black tea. Our house is a little cold though... now that it is fall in UPSNY I would say its usually < 65 in here. Is that the problem? Maybe I should look into this heat strip that was mentioned...

          Is it possible for the SCOBYs to grow (which they have) and somehow not ferment? That part confuses me... its not like nothing is happening - there is A LOT more SCOBY in there compared to when I started but it still tastes like Snapple

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          • #35
            Lorich the temp makes all the difference. My friend Joseph lives in Oakland and they got chilly. His first ferment took 5 weeks. He still did get baby SCOBYs. Then he got the heat strip and his next batch was ready in ten days. Optimal temp is 82-86 according to KK.

            Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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            • #36
              Really? My house is usually under 70 degrees. I’ll be making my fist batch of booch as soon as my SCOBY arrives from Amazon. With my household temp is it going to take me a long time to brew a batch? What is this “heat strip” people are talking about?
              “You may have thought you heard me say I wanted a lot of bacon and eggs, but what I said was: Give me all the bacon and eggs you have.” - Ron Swanson

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              • #37
                Mr. Koozie, do you have a cupboard or closet near your water heater that you can keep it in? Hannah from Kombuchakamp also suggests on top of a refrigerator. It still will work at a cooler temp, but it will take longer. The heat strip is from www.kombuchakamp.com. It was engineered for them by a company who makes floor heaters. Very low voltage and perfect warmth. It comes with a thermometer strip. It's fun to see what the temp is. They also have tons of good info. There is an 85 page document you can download for free. They have lots of supplies and flavorings.

                Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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                • #38
                  I started a new batch o 'booch and went away for 5 days camping, came back & its got mold on it WAAAAHHHHHH!
                  Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

                  http://primaldog.blogspot.co.uk/

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                  • #39
                    Oh Dino..that sucks. Pretty rare too.

                    <gets up to go check for mold>

                    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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                    • #40
                      Mine takes ten days. Longer and it's vinegar. But I keep mine at 73º as per Kombucha, The Balancing Act with my DIY heater.

                      I got mold once, too, but I always keep two jars brewing, so I just split the other culture and kept rolling. Left the moldy jar in the sun, washed it with soap, vinegar, baking soda, put it in the sun again, I NUKED it, ha ha. And no mold after that. It was also a stale culture, I was reviving it.

                      And since I have two cultures, if one starts tasting better, I just get rid of the other one and keep the yummier one. Survival of the yummiest!
                      Crohn's, doing SCD

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                      • #41
                        Knife, great site. I found it interesting about the temp. This time of year, mine hovers between 76-80. I think I need to give it more time. It's like making a yeast bread (those were the days ) and having a cooler kitchen with a slow growth dough..it always tasted better and had a better texture than fast growth dough.

                        Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                          I got mold once, too, but I always keep two jars brewing, so I just split the other culture and kept rolling. Left the moldy jar in the sun, washed it with soap, vinegar, baking soda, put it in the sun again, I NUKED it, ha ha. And no mold after that. It was also a stale culture, I was reviving it.
                          I had 3 jars going & they ALL got it
                          Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

                          http://primaldog.blogspot.co.uk/

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
                            Mr. Koozie, do you have a cupboard or closet near your water heater that you can keep it in? Hannah from Kombuchakamp also suggests on top of a refrigerator. It still will work at a cooler temp, but it will take longer. The heat strip is from Kombucha Tea | Kombucha Recipe | Kombucha Benefits. It was engineered for them by a company who makes floor heaters. Very low voltage and perfect warmth. It comes with a thermometer strip. It's fun to see what the temp is. They also have tons of good info. There is an 85 page document you can download for free. They have lots of supplies and flavorings.

                            Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
                            Thank you for the great info. This helps a lot!
                            “You may have thought you heard me say I wanted a lot of bacon and eggs, but what I said was: Give me all the bacon and eggs you have.” - Ron Swanson

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                              Mine takes ten days. Longer and it's vinegar. But I keep mine at 73º as per Kombucha, The Balancing Act with my DIY heater.

                              I got mold once, too, but I always keep two jars brewing, so I just split the other culture and kept rolling. Left the moldy jar in the sun, washed it with soap, vinegar, baking soda, put it in the sun again, I NUKED it, ha ha. And no mold after that. It was also a stale culture, I was reviving it.

                              And since I have two cultures, if one starts tasting better, I just get rid of the other one and keep the yummier one. Survival of the yummiest!
                              Can you elaborate on your DIY heater?
                              “You may have thought you heard me say I wanted a lot of bacon and eggs, but what I said was: Give me all the bacon and eggs you have.” - Ron Swanson

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                              • #45
                                It's a 10 gallon fish tank, half-filled with water and has a heater in it, with a heavy glass lid that almost seals it. The jars just sit on top and grow fine all winter.
                                Crohn's, doing SCD

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