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  • Yogurt.... Advice please ....

    Hi all,

    Just wondering what are the do's and donts when it comes to yogurt.

    We've just bought a yogurt maker.... It comes with it's own sachets to make the yogurt but I'm not sure.

    Cheers all

  • #2
    Hi Kiwigolfer

    I Primal as well as SCD, so I always made the 24 hour fermented yogurt. I always used the yogurt starter from GI Pro Health as it was non dairy... and then used goats milk, again for easier digestion. When fermenting the yogurt, make sure you test the temperature as the units tend to over heat after 8 hours. Many people have found dimmer switches helpful to protect from over heating.

    Hope this helps and good luck!

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    • #3
      What kinda of yogurt maker?

      When I make 1litre from a packet the cultures usually just go dormant in the fridge. So when I get down to about 100-200mL I top it up with milk & start the process over with the dormant cultures (add a bit of warmth & hay presto).
      I have an easy yo yogurt maker.

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      • #4
        Get your own milk and own starter... I wouldn't trust the packets unless it says it is free of gums and additives. Your "starter" could just be a small container of store bought yogurt. Add .5-1T or so per 1cup milk and that should be plenty.


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        HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

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        • #5
          ImageUploadedByMarks Daily Apple Forum1385929145.258535.jpg it all looks quite good and says it natural

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          • #6
            Anyone used one of these?

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            • #7
              Don't sweat it. Half of the fun is figuring out what works and what you like best. Once you get things going you can use the yogurt you previously made, or store bought live culture yogurt, as the starter. I think that with the yogurt maker it takes all of the potential problems out of the equation. I haven't made it in a while but I didn't have a maker and got pretty good results just using the warm oven in a crock pot method. Good luck and enjoy the ride.
              Some of you may die, but that is a risk I'm willing to take.

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              • #8
                The image is not showing up. If it looks good go ahead and use it! Then save 1 cup for starter culture for next time.


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                ------
                HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

                My Journal: gelatin experiments, vanity pictures, law school rants, recipe links


                Food blog: GELATIN and BONE BROTH recipes

                " The best things in life are free and the 2nd best are expensive!" - Coco Chanel

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                • #9
                  It's called easyyo yogurt maker.... Just bought some of their unsweetened Greek to try lol

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                  • #10
                    I'm looking at one of these:

                    Amazon.com: Euro Cuisine YM80 Yogurt Maker: Kitchen & Dining

                    I've been doing it in the crockpot, but I'm looking to try something different.

                    I'm a bit skeptical on the jars, though, since I pretty universally strain my product.

                    M.

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                    • #11
                      Here is the method I started from.

                      I've been making yogurt weekly from a half gallon of organic whole milk and 1/2 cup of reserves from the previous batch (started with plain organic stoneyfield) for awhile now. I use a crock pot to start and finish in a cooler with a heating pad wrapped with a towel for around twelve hours. Then I strain it for half and hour or so, chill in the refrigerator overnight, and stir before serving. Super rich and really creamy.

                      I've found that the best temperature for fermentation is between 90-110F. The link above suggests as high as 130F, which didn't kill the cultures, but made the yogurt really curdy.

                      I strain it to concentrate it a little and thicken the texture. Every time I've made yogurt, it doesn't end up like store bough kinds; it's more like drinkable yogurt (traders point if you've ever had it is exactly what it looks like). I've heard of adding dry milk powder in the early heating stages to thicken, but dry milk upsets my gut and I am suspicious of anything I couldn't potentially make.

                      Other ways to thicken it would be using higher fat milk or adding gelatin before the heating stage. Of course, there's nothing wrong with drinkable yogurt either. Makes a great smoothie like texture with berries or fruits.

                      If you can source raw milk, you don't actually need to pasteurize it in the first step. (I actually have quit pasteurizing my regular organic milk; I figure it's straight from a sterile carton and my yogurt hasn't gone off yet) You can heat it to a certain temp for a certain time (Google?) if you're paranoid, but raw milk has natural good bacteria so it's not really necessary.

                      Definitely check the temperature frequently until your yogurt maker has proven reliable, though avoid disturbing the yogurt if you can. Too hot will kill the bacteria, then you just have thick pasteurized milk, but lower than 90F won't ferment with the common strains. Good luck and have fun. Growing bacteria is a little like growing plants or pets; every time is a little different, and you learn from it. Of course, you get to eat the bacteria.

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                      • #12
                        Rather under the impression that the first heating stage, pre-culturing, is to sterilize the pot.

                        M.

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                        • #13
                          This is really easy just put sachet into beaker, fill with water and shake. Put boiling water into a container and put beaker in. Leave for 8-12 hours and hey presto yogurt....

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                          • #14
                            For really thick yogurt use milk instead of water

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                            • #15
                              Thanks have you got one?

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