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  • Dining out?

    Coming from the McRib thread, I was wondering that for paleo folks, and those who have food sensitivities to grains, do you dine out?

    I basically don't, and typically when I do I don't enjoy it. The last time that was an exception was the Whole Foods Buffet in Sante Fe, NM in September. Why eat out, anyway, if I can grill a nice grass fed steak at home?


    Come to think of it? Are there any paleo restaurants in this world? If so, where and how are they? I've seen vegan ones, so there must be some paleo ones, or that is the next niche market ready to break out.

  • #2
    Yup--small restaurants are sometimes gems and sometimes terrible, but chains are always terrible. There is a handful of immigrant-run cafés and delis in my area that I trust and it took a while to find them. Everywhere else, the menu is just unimaginative blobs of soggy white bowling-alley food.
    37//6'3"/185

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    • #3
      I don't foresee any coming out because whole foods are hard to profit off of. First off it's hard to market the food. A box of cereal is $4 and probably cost less than a quarter of a cent of wheat in the box and the box costs more than the crap inside. You can't package beef that way. Plus how are the restaurants going to flavor the meat? Adding MSG like steak houses do and just call the restaurant Paleo, people would taste the processed food additives and the companies need that to make you eat more an feel full. If a Paleo restaurant comes out, it would have to be privately owned and overpriced just to make a profit. Heck grass fed beef at the store is 2-3 times as much as hormone beef. So a $8 burger at a steakhouse would be $16.

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      • #4
        Chains are not always terrible. McCormicks and Stanfords are two off of the top of my head that do a good job. Canola free? I doubt it.

        Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          I prefer eating at home. Sometimes if we go out I steer towards Thai or steakhouse. I can cook as well as most restaurants other than the fancy elite ones. A poor mans Sous Vide setup in a crock-pot can do wonders with tough cuts of meat, awesome brisket last night!

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          • #6
            I'm not sensitive at the level of some people. I eat sushi prepared with normal soy sauce. Someone else mentioned McCormicks. Brio has a risotto. I went to a convention recently that had a gluten-free option for the lunches.

            But mostly we cook at home and I pack a lot of food when I have to go out and stay in timeshares or hotel suites with kitchens when I travel.
            “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
            Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

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            • #7
              Its pretty easy to find food that doesn't contain grains, or gluten. The only thing to worry about is cooking in vegetable oils which is really unavoidable unless you are at a high class restaurant.
              http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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              • #8
                I'm very nervous eating out. I trust hardly anyone. I wish it didn't have to be that way, but I simply can't enjoy myself knowing that somebody in the kitchen of some random restaurant may have added something that will make me sick for a week or more (and keep me from exercising for 3 weeks due to inflammation).

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                • #9
                  Dining out?

                  Chipotle isn't bad. Almost all organic/pastured stuff. Leave off the stuff you don't want. I get the salad with meat, veggies, pico de gallo, sour cream. You can add guacamole too.

                  Chili's isn't bad...fajitas without tortillas if you can stand the seed oil (take some vit e)

                  Ihop. Ask for "shell egg" omelettes and that would make them not have the pancake batter in them.

                  Sushi/sashimi... Although sometimes sushi has seed oil in the rice. I still eat it with some vit e.

                  Steamed dishes at Chinese restaurants. Most people associate Chinese cuisine with sweet and sour crap but I always get the steamed whole fish, sliced beef tendons (hold the chili oil which is soybean/peanut oil), (and if I am like ffff it I don't care about PUFA) lamb with cumin &chili peppers, etc.

                  Steakhouses will cook stuff in butter for you if you ask nicely...

                  BBQ joints if you are in the south...

                  Mexican joints with their fajitas, and fajita salads are awesome.

                  BareBurger can serve their grassfed burgers in lettuce... But they proudly tell you they use canola oil for health. Ugh. Not sure if they are a local chain or more national.

                  Most diners/American restaurants I get a salad (chef's or Cobb) with vinegar on the side. Still too much PUFA and crap IMO but whatever... Better than fried stuff.

                  Korean joints: they have rolls just like sushi except less chance of seed oil, kimchi and other fermented stuff, BBQ (you can often choose your marinade), beef short ribs, bimbibap- bowls of rice/meat/pickled veggies, raw egg. Nom.

                  Ceviche in Spanish joints. Relatively safe.

                  That said I maybe eat out once a week at most and it is out of necessity (business lunch...)
                  Last edited by turquoisepassion; 12-02-2013, 08:54 PM.
                  ------
                  HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

                  My Journal: gelatin experiments, vanity pictures, law school rants, recipe links


                  Food blog: GELATIN and BONE BROTH recipes

                  " The best things in life are free and the 2nd best are expensive!" - Coco Chanel

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                  • #10
                    With the amount of money I spend on groceries I usually only go out to eat only for birthdays or my anniversary.

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                    • #11
                      First of all, I find it funny that you mention Whole Foods in Santa Fe, NM as I literally was there yesterday - HA!

                      But anyways, yes, I do dine out every so often, but I have my specific restaurants I like to go out to. I have a lot of food intolerances so I have to be careful, but I find that Med. food, cooked in olive oil works well for me, as does sashimi and some other japanese dishes such as Kama and handrolls without rice or sauces.

                      If you can believe it, there are some Paleo restaurants out there, and I think it really is starting to catch on! I know for a fact there are many in Los Angeles!

                      This all being said, I MUCH PREFER eating at home!

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                      • #12
                        Yep there is a Paleo restaurant here. Tons of almond flour baked rolls. Blech. Their food is good but so overpriced and I always think "man I could just make that at home."
                        ------
                        HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

                        My Journal: gelatin experiments, vanity pictures, law school rants, recipe links


                        Food blog: GELATIN and BONE BROTH recipes

                        " The best things in life are free and the 2nd best are expensive!" - Coco Chanel

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                        • #13
                          I have celiac disease and I'm very sensitive, so I rarely eat out. The only times are when I'm traveling (and even then, I bring food to minimize the eating out) and when we occasionally go to a fine-dining restaurant. Otherwise, it's not worth the risk for me.

                          There's a paleo food cart in Portland, OR that I tried when we were there last year. I think it's called the Cultured Caveman - they've got grass fed meat, sweet potato fries, bacon-wrapped dates, salads, etc. Good stuff!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GiGiEats View Post
                            First of all, I find it funny that you mention Whole Foods in Santa Fe, NM as I literally was there yesterday - HA!

                            If you can believe it, there are some Paleo restaurants out there, and I think it really is starting to catch on! I know for a fact there are many in Los Angeles!

                            This all being said, I MUCH PREFER eating at home!

                            I like that one best of the 3 New Mexico locations. Their selections are the nicest, and the park across the street is where I like to go eat and then walk around afterwards. I like the plantings of grama grass, which turned a nice golden color by late September. In summer, the grass and flower were nice, and then thee is that sunken garden which was pretty with all the sunflowers. Some of the prairies south of I-40 were really lush and green this summer with the above average monsoon flow, but they are grazed by cattle, and there are limited flowers beyond the fences. Lots of pronghorn, though. Either way, it's a cool little park in the urban setting.

                            I thought LA might have paleo restaurants, as might NYC. Sadly, my idea of a paleo restaurant is not breads and things that resemble standard foods. Mostly, it's grilled grass fed things, steamed or fried, or grilled vegetables, and fruits and things like that. In theory, paleo should not require a lot of prep time, or skill. Not my paleo, at least. Cooking is what we had to do to make lousy, flavorless things palatable, in my opinion.
                            Last edited by Jim_H; 12-03-2013, 10:45 AM.

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                            • #15
                              i eat out a few times per week and it's not a big deal. sashimi, oysters, grass-fed burgers with a side of steamed veggies are all easy to find. we have great southeast asian restaurants for stuff like pho (no noodles, please!) and larb.

                              some good peruvian for ceviche.

                              our local chefs are also very involved in the nose-to-tail movement and house-made charcuterie movement, so i get well-made oogly bits on a regular basis. also excellent local cheeses.

                              we're on the coast, so fresh local fish is abundant too.

                              i don't eat at chains, unless it's like a morton's or a mccormick and schmick's, and order carefully when there.
                              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                              – Ernest Hemingway

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