Ad Widget

Collapse

How not to ruin grass-fed beef?

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How not to ruin grass-fed beef?

    Can anyone give advice on how not to ruin grassfed beef? I've never had a problem with store bought grassfed beef but I've recently started purchasing my meats from a local farmer who does grassfed and grass finished with absolutely nothing else. These meats are coming out very chewy and tough. I have no problem with cooking conventional cuts. I'm looking for advise on techniques to keep the neat tenderized. I already salt and pepper my meats hours before cooking and always allow them to reach room temp before cooking. I also have been trying to cook more on the rare side but they still come out very tough. Should I be marinating? For example, I have a nice sirloin steak I plan to cook tonight. Any advise?

  • #2
    Perhaps the farm you get your meat from is slaughtering them too early before they can get fat. If the issue is that the meat is just too lean you have to aggressively marinate with something acidic like wine or vinegar or braise for at least 3 hours. Not the best...

    Comment


    • #3
      If you don't see sufficient marbling in the meat it will likely be tough. Marinate it first or cook it slow to break down fiber.
      Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
      Old Paths ... New Journeys

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by seanbrenna View Post
        Perhaps the farm you get your meat from is slaughtering them too early before they can get fat. If the issue is that the meat is just too lean you have to aggressively marinate with something acidic like wine or vinegar or braise for at least 3 hours. Not the best...
        There's plenty of fat on the pieces of beef I'm getting. Sometimes a steak will be almost half and half. I'll try to marinate it longer.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by John Caton View Post
          If you don't see sufficient marbling in the meat it will likely be tough. Marinate it first or cook it slow to break down fiber.
          I'll have to experiment with doing it slower and over less heat I guess. Everything I've read about grassfed beef has said to do it fast over high heat so has not to toughen it up. Any suggestions on a simple marinade? I read that the author of "Tender Grassfed Beef" suggests just olive oil.

          Comment


          • #6
            I bought from two places. One aged the beef, the other didn't. Big difference.

            One is more expensive. You can guess which.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Eich View Post
              I bought from two places. One aged the beef, the other didn't. Big difference.

              One is more expensive. You can guess which.
              How long did they age it for? The farm I'm purchasing from drops off to the butcher and then picks up 2-3 weeks later. I assume it's aging all that time but idk.

              Comment


              • #8
                Why do you salt so far in advance?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by vb66 View Post
                  Why do you salt so far in advance?
                  I've always been under the impression you should season ahead of time so it gets absorbed into the meat.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Salt. We get to osmoregulation. Osmoregulation is an organism's ability to control and bring into balance the inner and outer homeostasis of fluids.

                    When you salt a meat (or anything really), you change the homeostasis. There is more fluid on the inside than on the outside. The meat/fish/whatever will throw off water to come to balance. This makes the food more concentrated. This is why I believe (though not everyone agrees with me) that salt should be used to concentrate flavor, not to necessarily make something "salty."

                    Brining uses the same construct.

                    There is one online source of grass fed meat that I use that practically sends a manual for how to cook grass fed meat, and it's mostly slow and low.

                    Try this: http://www.amazon.com/R%C3%B6mertopf...ds=clay+cooker - slow and low. I've never had it let me down.
                    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                    B*tch-lite

                    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sous vide works great for tough meats. However consider this, some butchers/processors take the higher quality beef and substitute the lower end stuff. Yes dishonesty isn't limited to Wall Street & politics. I've heard many horror stories from different farmers about this. I've also had some pretty crappy GF beef and some really great stuff. This particular farm has talked about the butchering problem, don't know if it is still on the website, but have a look.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My science nerd in me says salting way ahead of time draws moisture out of the meat, possibly making it drier? I don't know if that actually holds true. If it works fine for other cuts it shouldn't make grass-fed tougher.

                        What cut of meat are you doing? The farmer I get my beef from says that certain grass-fed steaks need to be marinated or they will be tough.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes. The salting is going to draw out moisture from the meat. You should salt no more than 5 or 10 minutes before cooking the meat-- this according to professional chefs.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BratKat View Post
                            Yes. The salting is going to draw out moisture from the meat. You should salt no more than 5 or 10 minutes before cooking the meat-- this according to professional chefs.
                            Professional chefs are in complete disagreement over this. Salting meat many hours ahead of time works very well IMO. The salt draws the water out, but if left long enough the water reabsorbs taking the salt with it. Several tests have been done and are available online, with very mixed results as far as taste testing - some like it and others don't. I prefer the longer salt option.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Do a search on "dry brining" for discussion on the reasons people salt meat way in advance. One site I read claims pre-salting tenderizes the meat(!) Interesting stuff...will have to experiment.
                              Late 50s, post-menopausal, low carb with some dairy, following the 5 Leptin Rules, taking ThyroGold, eating lots o' fiber and zero wheat with great results. My Primal Journal

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X