Ad Widget

Collapse

Fat + Carbs = Recipe for Disaster?

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • brahnamin
    started a topic Fat + Carbs = Recipe for Disaster?

    Fat + Carbs = Recipe for Disaster?



    Okay, this is maybe an odd little question.


    The benefits of going high fat/protein-low carb are very obvious to me. And now my wife is intrigued (I think it was watching me flash-fry eggs in bacon grease that won her over) . . . which is what I have been subtly pushing for since I discovered (and became convinced of) primal eating.


    Here's the thing. I do the cooking in our house, so we're having a lot of primal meals, but she generally forages for her own lunch and breakfast and snacks.


    What I know is going to end up happening, until she's all the way convinced, is she's going to be taking in high fat on one end of her diet and high carbs (read as bread and rice and potatoes) on the other.


    She's been following a low fat, calorie counting diet and losing weight on it (the hard way, of course). So, I guess what I want to know is, Will eating high fat and high carbs just be a double whammy for her in this transitional phase?


    Keep in mind, she could be on the fence for awhile.


    Is high fat at all helpful if you don't significantly reduce carbs as well? (Other than that it will keep her fuller and thus less likely to eat quite so many carbs).


    I'm convinced once she sees me dropping the weight and once she sees my bloodwork in August she'll come on over to the dark side. But in the meanwhile I don't want to sabotage her efforts if a partial fix is going to do more harm than good.


  • SassaFrass88
    replied
    1



    So there you have it. Instead of purchasing 'Carb-Blocker' pills, eat some pistachios! ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1



    No problem, I think you can replace pistachios with pretty much any healthy fat in terms of the impact on blood sugar.

    Leave a comment:


  • DiabetesCanKissMyButt
    replied
    1



    Conan, thanks for the info on pistachios and blood glucose. Very interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • FlyNavyWife
    replied
    1



    You're welcome.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Sisson
    replied
    1



    Thanks, FlyNavyWife, for the spam notice. I'll try to fix this.

    Leave a comment:


  • brahnamin
    replied
    1



    Funny thing is, the knucklehead hasn't checked his links. They're dead. Mark's site has a funny little glitch that causes [a href] links to tank if you put them in in the usual fashion. Dunno if that was intentional or just a quirk of programing, but I stumbled over it the first few times I posted links here, but I found the fix [which I won't post here on the off chance that our spammer actually reads the posts - though I doubt that very much].

    Leave a comment:


  • FlyNavyWife
    replied
    1



    SPAM - Mark, these comments like from shelly123 have been popping up.. usually with 3 digits at the end of the username, always with a full (fake) name in the comment, adn that "workouts" link at the end of the comment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1



    Nice concern has been put forward, it is all perfect and doesn't require any extra addition..

    Shelly smith

    =======================

    <a href="//www.trainwithmeonline.com"" rel="dofollow"">

    workouts</a>

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1



    Here is a link to a study suggesting that fats may help control insulin levels on a high carb diet:


    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/69933.php


    'The findings suggest that consumption of pistachios with a carbohydrate-rich meal significantly lowered the d blood glucose response. As consumption of pistachios increased, the blood sugar lowering response was enhanced. In addition, when pistachios were consumed alone, the rise in blood glucose was minimal.


    The researchers also monitored the effect of pistachios consumed with different common carbohydrate foods on postprandial glycemia, or blood sugar levels after eating. The addition of pistachios to a number of other commonly consumed carbohydrate-rich foods such as mashed potatoes, pasta and rice also resulted in significant reductions in the blood sugar response, compared to when these foods were eaten alone."

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1



    I agree. Insulin drives fat directly into fat cells. However, it can also drive carbohydrate and protein into fat cells so I disagree with the notion that eating low fat and high carbs is somehow better than adding some insulin lowering fat to a high carb diet.

    Leave a comment:


  • SassaFrass88
    replied
    1



    No, I can't find the EXACT quote from his book, but he states that the science behind it is (simplistically) that the insulin drives the fat directly to the fat cells.


    I will look more into it, but it really caught my attention, since he was talking 'science' (my FAVORITE topic ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1



    I'd like to see the science behind that. My understanding of the science has always been that fat reduces the insulin response, even in junk food like m&ms. In fact, you can easily see the insulin reducing effect of fat by looking at the gi index of carbs with and without fat. Maybe mark's point is that elevated insulin levels from high carb diets make it easier for all excess calories to be stored as fat. I think the science is pretty clear that fat lowers insulin response.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sue
    replied
    1



    Somewhere else I read don't eat high fat and high carb together particularly if its also a low protein meal.


    If you do the carb cycling its recommended that when carbs high, fats are low.

    Leave a comment:


  • brahnamin
    replied
    1



    Hrm.


    @ SassaFrass


    See, that's what I was thinking might be the case. Because it is going to contribute to your overall calories without giving you the benefit of lowered insulin (since you're still sucking in carbs) and there is little chance you won't overeat since carbs create cravings that have little or nothing to do with actual hunger (so you bypass the satiety benefit of lots of fat, too).

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X