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  • Bone Broth is low in minerals.

    Hello everyone!

    I made several different batches of Bone Broth and sent them off to a lab to get analyzed for mineral and protein content. The results are in, and bone broth is decidedly not rich in minerals, no matter how you slice it. It is however extremely high in protein.

    I've written a journalistic article detailing my process, methodologies and results. I've also made an easy to read comparative table of all my results in the Appendix. I've made both documents available in Dropbox for anyone to see. Follow the links here:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/npcytm0zw1...x%201.pdf?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/rysyv8m2x0...lyzed.pdf?dl=0

    Interestingly, Sally Fallon and Kaayla Daniels have just published a follow-up book to Nourishing Traditions called Nourishing Broth. They also made different batched of bone broth and sent them off to labs for analysis and they reached the exact same conclusions as I have. For a quick overview of this work, look for Kaayla Daniels' video at the last Ancestral Health Symposium (2014), available on Youtube.

    If anyone has any questions about my research, please feel free to contact me at the e-mail provided or through this blog.

    Enjoy!

    Lawrence

  • #2
    Perhaps the best post on this forum I've ever read!!!
    It mirrors my frustration with the lack of information on something that is so widely hyped without a real source of data to back it up. I applaud you for doing this.

    Next up maybe you can tackle the Phytate hysteria that makes me feel guilty eating an Almond. Another of the poorly backed up bits of science floating around.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think Mark might have addressed this some time back. But it's still good gelatin which was always my primary reason for having it around. And like any other broth, it's a good base for easy throw-together meals.

      Still, it's good information. Information is power.

      *chuckling* at almond guilt.
      "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

      B*tch-lite

      Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lawrence Dubois View Post
        Hello everyone!

        I made several different batches of Bone Broth and sent them off to a lab to get analyzed for mineral and protein content. The results are in, and bone broth is decidedly not rich in minerals, no matter how you slice it. It is however extremely high in protein.

        I've written a journalistic article detailing my process, methodologies and results. I've also made an easy to read comparative table of all my results in the Appendix. I've made both documents available in Dropbox for anyone to see. Follow the links here:
        https://www.dropbox.com/s/npcytm0zw1...x%201.pdf?dl=0
        https://www.dropbox.com/s/rysyv8m2x0...lyzed.pdf?dl=0

        Interestingly, Sally Fallon and Kaayla Daniels have just published a follow-up book to Nourishing Traditions called Nourishing Broth. They also made different batched of bone broth and sent them off to labs for analysis and they reached the exact same conclusions as I have. For a quick overview of this work, look for Kaayla Daniels' video at the last Ancestral Health Symposium (2014), available on Youtube.

        If anyone has any questions about my research, please feel free to contact me at the e-mail provided or through this blog.

        Enjoy!

        Lawrence

        Good effort, can serve as data points for those who want data. I wonder how much you would get from pressure-cooking (which is what I do at home, to save time and EL).

        But you know, I guess you don't just survive on bone broth! Usually it serves as a base for soups, stews, rice cooking, etc. Bone broth is not rich in minerals but you usually eat nutritious foods + bone broth. The broth's main point is to add gelatin to an otherwise gelatin poor diet. The extra minerals are a bonus but not a reliable one. It's been known.

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice work! Did you use vinegar?
          Last edited by MaceyUK; 11-04-2014, 07:19 AM.
          Man seeks to change the foods available in nature to suit his tastes, thereby putting an end to the very essence of life contained in them.
          www.primaljoy.co.uk

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MaceyUK View Post
            Did you use vinegar?
            Sally certainly does. She also cooks stock for far longer than a chef would.

            So if hers was found to be low in minerals then it would seem that using vinegar doesn't make much difference in that regard. IIRC, Sally has said in the past that it's advisable to consume broth for the minerals. It seems she was wrong.

            However I'd always understood that the main point of it was these:

            The structure of glycosaminoglycans and their interactions with pro... - PubMed - NCBI



            I have seen an account of hunter-gatherers grinding bones and sprinkling the powder in their food. (Hunter-gatherers would, of course, find it difficult to acquire stockpots pre-contact with more sedentary peoples, and I doubt you could make stock by stone-boiling in a pit.) I guess by actually eating the powdered bone, you would get at the minerals -- though whether many groups did this, and whether those that did did it for this purpose or simply to fill empty stomachs when other things to put in them were short I don't know. The reference is in Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's Naufragios.

            Naufragios de Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca by 16th cent. Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca - Free Ebook

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            • #7
              You can actually boil in a skin bag, Lewis. Doesn't mean broth was made though, as you said.

              As for the experiment, thank you! I'd expressed interest in the content a while back but we never got anywhere. Sadly, I can't read Dropbox here on break at the office so it will have to wait until I get home.

              You mention it is "extremely high in protein", which makes me wonder what's up with the boxed broth I use at home for making yellow rice; protein content is only about 4g / cup.

              M.

              M.

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              • #8
                Now I have had time to read the whole thing I can see that the experiments were conducted with rigour and a great deal of thought. Science at its best. I'll still be making bb but probably for the glycine and proline.
                Man seeks to change the foods available in nature to suit his tastes, thereby putting an end to the very essence of life contained in them.
                www.primaljoy.co.uk

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is awesome. I've seen questions over and over again about the nutritional content of bone broth. It's nice to have some answers. Thanks for sharing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I actually just started an n=1 experiment with broth right now. Earlier this year, (March-May) I was really on top of making broth and I was making a lot of soup because it was still pretty cold here. During this time, I actually grew more hair. Not just, oh the quality of my hair improved, but there were more individual hairs and they were growing FAST! At the time I couldn't figure out what was causing it. You would think it should have been super obvious but I had just moved and a lot of things in my life had changed. There were so many variables.

                    Then, in about June or July I think, it quit. I was taking a shower and TONS of hair was coming out. I had abnormally high shedding for a couple days and then, poof, back to where I was before. It was really depressing. I tried everything, I had changed conditioners when I moved so I thought playing with that might help, no, then I remembered I had been eating a lot of oranges during that time so maybe it was vitamin C, no, that hasn't helped. I don't know why it took me so long to think of the broth, I quit making soups in summer because it was so hot. It is the last thing I can think of that could have been causing it. So I am going into full blown broth mode now and we'll see what happens.
                    You are an animal on this planet and the rules of engagement are non negotiable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by eats.meats.west View Post
                      Perhaps the best post on this forum I've ever read!!!
                      It mirrors my frustration with the lack of information on something that is so widely hyped without a real source of data to back it up. I applaud you for doing this.

                      Next up maybe you can tackle the Phytate hysteria that makes me feel guilty eating an Almond. Another of the poorly backed up bits of science floating around.
                      Thanks eats.meats.west!
                      I really hoped someone out there would appreciate it as much as me.
                      I would really love to do a similar experiment with phytates, though I'm not sure how feasible it would be. i.e. I'm not sure the lab I've been dealing with offers such testing, and if so at what cost. Worth looking into...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Phytate has already been studied

                        Phytic acid added to white-wheat bread inhibits fractional apparent magnesium absorption in humans
                        Conclusion: The results show that fractional magnesium absorption from white-wheat bread is significantly impaired by the addition of phytic acid, in a dose-dependent manner, at amounts similar to those naturally present in whole-meal and brown bread.
                        My opinions and some justification

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                        • #13
                          So if the real benefit of bone broth is the protein is supplementing with gelatin just as good?
                          Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=FrenchFry;1558106]Good effort, can serve as data points for those who want data. I wonder how much you would get from pressure-cooking (which is what I do at home, to save time and EL).[/
                            QUOTE]

                            I believe it was yesterday's post about using a pressure cooker. Mark does.
                            Female back to the basics: 5-2017
                            CW: 2017: 150
                            GW: 130 a dream, I know
                            Muscle soreness surrounding Neck, Thyroid and Rosacea issues.

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=perennialpam;1558587]
                              Originally posted by FrenchFry View Post
                              Good effort, can serve as data points for those who want data. I wonder how much you would get from pressure-cooking (which is what I do at home, to save time and EL).[/
                              QUOTE]

                              I believe it was yesterday's post about using a pressure cooker. Mark does.
                              As stated in my article, I used a 12psi pressure cooker for all of my broth samples. It is all I ever use when making bone broth. As FrenchFry states, it saves time and electricity, but I also find the quality of the broth better than when done in a regular pot.

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